Quantcast

Search Results for: "steel wool"

Awesome Long Exposures Using Steel Wool

The most common method of light painting is using a flashlight and moving it around while shooting long exposures. We all know that trick, and many times it looks a little gimmicky. This is why I really like when people think of other, more creative ways to do light painting. Using burning Steel Wool can create awesome looking photos. Its super cheap, creative and can give your photos the X-Factor.

[more]

Crazy Motion Graphics Created By Burning Steel Wool

We’ve posted about how to photograph steel wool burning before in the past, but watching the process in action is a bit more exciting. Instead of taking photographs with extended shutters, film maker Joey Shanks decided to video the burning metal and edit everything into a motion graphics piece. The results are pretty interesting, and his behind the scenes video explains how the whole process came together.

[DIY] Light Painting with Steel Wool

When it comes to photography projects, Benjamin Von Wong is one of the most prolific guys I know. It seems like every few posts I’m compelled to bring you something cool Ben is doing. Whether it’s playing with his pliable models, setting them ablaze or just a quick tip. His latest venture has him teaming up with Udi Tirosh over at DIY Photography to show us how to light paint with steel wool. Including the basic technique, location, safety and a few other helpful tips to consider. For someone who plays with fire as much as Ben and with hair that big, he must know what he is doing… right? [more]

Contest Entry: Burning Steel Wool

Dave, Jono, and Braden are some fun lads from Australia who like to sling around burning metal during their photoshoots. Luckily for our readers they decided to participate in the behind the scenes video contest and show everyone how they too can get this wild effect. Check out this interesting video and feel free to leave comments for the guys below!

A BTS Look at Diorama Landscape Photography

Photographer/Diorama Artist Matthew Albanese constructs and photographs unreal real looking landscape scenes using readily accessible materials. Scroll through some of his work and be amazed at their realism, effort and the materials. Can you figure out what Matthew used to make each scene before reading it? No, no you can’t. [more]

Made by Novum