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Documentary

Nat Geo Live! Alison Wright: Portraits of the Human Spirit

Alison Wright is a tremendous inspiration as a photographer and a human being. In this always fantastic episode of National Geographic Live! we are shown just some of her adventures and a glimpse of her unrelenting fearlessness. After almost being killed in a bus crash in Laos in 2000, she persevered though a recovery process where she was told she would have trouble with mobility and never work as a photographer again. Two years later, she climbed Mt. Kilimanjaro. [more]

The Picture Project- London by Night

Matt Davey, a music photographer based in Essex, and iPhonographer Dilshad Corleone take to the streets of London and go on a fun journey of self-discovery and in the process create a collaborative project of creative individuals using the power of photography. I caught up with Matt and he broke down the project and the great experiences that he gained from collaborating with his fellow colleagues. [more]

Andrew Newey’s Striking Photographs of Traditional Honey Hunters in Nepal

Documentary photographer Andrew Newey recently traveled to central Nepal to document the Gurung tribe’s ancient tradition of honey hunting. Twice a year, hunters congregate at the feet of the Himalayas to harvest the honey of the world’s largest honeybee-Apis Laboriosa. [more]

Photo Series Gives Insight into the Everyday Lives of the Ku Klux Klan

Photojournalist, humanitarian and former marine Anthony Karen spent a decade documenting the lives of Ku Klux Klan members, gaining unprecedented access to a rarely-seen world. Karen’s interest in documenting this society required months of reaching out to Klan members before he was eventually allowed access to an event. First in rural Tennessee, Karen’s work eventually brought him to document groups across the United States. His resulting series, Ku Klux Klan, is fascinating and surprisingly intimate.   [more]

Photographer Chris Rainier Tells the Inspiring Stories of His World Travels

In this fantastic video from National Geographic Live!, documentary photography Chris Rainier talks about his adventures around the world, the myriad cultures he’s encountered and the power of photography to translate an emotional response to the art that exists all around us. Rainer began his career as the last assistant to Ansel Adams – a position he doesn’t take lightly and one that helpe define is way of seeing. [more]

Michael Christopher Brown on Living and Working in the DRC

The Democratic Republic of Congo, often referred to simply as “DRC”, is a country steeped in reports of extreme violence, corruption and unrest. Citing ethnic conflict and the pursuit of control over abundant mineral resources, The New York Times referred to the country as “one of the biggest battlefields in Africa’s history.” [more]

Behind the Scenes: Garry Winogrand at Work on the Street

Garry Winogrand is considered by some to be one of the top American photographers of his, or any generation. His books “The Animals” and “Public Relations” are classics, and the number of rolls of film he took over his short life are staggering. When he died he left behind 9,000 rolls of developed and undeveloped film. I can’t even imagine the costs involved in processing and scanning those negatives. [more]

Steve McCurry Shoots the Last Roll of Kodachrome Film

“All good things must come to an end.” It’s a common theme throughout this special by National Geographic in which we follow Steve McCurry on his quest of shooting the last roll of Kodak Kodachrome film ever made. It’s a pretty daunting and heavy assignment to be sure – one McCurry is no stranger to. That fact is even more apparent when we learn that it was McCurry who asked for the final roll. [more]

What Does This Video Mean For The Future of Photojournalism?

Over the last two days, Kiev, Ukraine has seen its worst violence since the Soviet era, with the death toll now at 75. Fighting between police and protesters escalated when protesters used Molotov cocktails and lit several fires in the city square. This video – shot on a drone – shows the epic devastation from above, and I believe this may mark a very significant turning point in photojournalism. Has the public’s desire for the theatrical become too large a part of journalism? [more]

Andrea Bruce Documents an Iraqi Family’s Journey West

Publications allowing individual photographers access to their Instagram accounts is an increasingly common practice, and helps to foster a more intimate look at a photographer’s process. For example, Time Magazine allowed several photographers access to its Instagram account after Hurricane Sandy, enabling the magazine to update its almost 600k followers in real time.  [more]

George Tice: Seeing Beyond the Moment

Fine art photographer George Tice is a master craftsman of the medium and the documentary “George Tice: Seeing Beyond the Moment” explores his rise from family portraitist to accomplished artist and educator. The film, which is available on IMDB in its entirety, was successfully funded through director Bruce Wodder’s Newstreetfilms via a Kickstarter campaign. It is an evocative look at the American landscape through the lens of one of the 20th Century’s greatest photographers.

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(Graphic) National Geographic Live! : Photographing Africa’s Wildest Beasts

Photographer Michael “Nick” Nichols is a National Geographic veteran and one of the best wildlife photographers working today. In this episode of National Geographic Live!, his imagery and stories about Africa’s elephants and lions will both break and warm your heart. In his own words, Nichols tells his stories behind the already fantastic magazine stories – ranging from the disgusting aftermath of ivory poachers to the cute and cuddly playfulness of lion cubs [more]

Gritty Film Causes Controversy Over America’s Youth

Back in October 2013, I went to the Philadelphia Film Festival and was lucky enough to catch the documentary film 12 O’Clock Boys, by Lofty Nathan. After the film debuted, Nathan answered some of the audience’s questions. One of the most controversial questions asked was how race played a factor while shooting in a predominantly black neighborhood. [more]

Patrick Brown’s “Trading to Extinction” Project

Black bear bile, rhino horns, shark fins and other endangered wildlife and their illicit trade account for more than $10 billion annually. For the past ten years, documentary photographer Patrick Brown has explored this story, shooting from the jungles of Cambodia to the markets of Guangzhou. The work is now collected in the book “Trading to Extinction,” published by Dewi Llewis and released to coincide with this week’s global summit on illegal wildlife trade hosted in London.

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Back In The Day – The New York City Subway In All Its Former Glory

In 1985 there were approximately 40 recorded felonies on the New York City subway system. Every single day. It’s a wonder how young photographer Chris Morris mustered the courage to set off on to the mean (subterranean) streets and begin months of personal project work documenting the New York subway. [more]

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