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Natural Light

The Best Way To Get Assaulted With Street Photography

Recently Petapixel featured a rather amusing video of photographer Fabio Pires out of London. Fabio is a street photographer who shoots spontaneous photos off the cuff. Unlike the video we featured of Clay Enos’s street setup, Fabio’s approach is more in your face, candid, and potentially more risky. In Fabio’s opinion, the best shots come from strange and interesting people who aren’t expecting to have their photo taken. I dunno, maybe in England this isn’t frowned upon as much as it is in the United States?

Shoot, Print, And Frame A Massive Peter Lik Style Photograph On A Budget

If you have seen Peter Lik’s work in person then you understand that it’s impossible to put into words the look and quality of his prints. Peter’s photography (and his post production) is fantastic, but what really makes his work stand out is his printing and presentation. If his images were printed on standard photo paper at a standard size, his work would not have the same “wow” factor.

Right before a trip to Italy I went back into Peter’s studio for a little inspiration. After studying his work and speaking with a sales rep about his printing process I decided to shoot, print, and frame a shot in Italy for the absolute cheapest price without losing the “wow” factor that Peter’s work has. This is how I did it.



The Latest Camera Trend: Throwing Your Camera In The Air

It seems like there are at least a dozen “photo trends” going on right now but this one has to be the most abstract and definitely the most risky. Steven Leckart of Wired Magazine explains how you too can bring out the artist inside of you by throwing and twirling your point and shoot camera into the air with a long exposure. While Steven explains that you need a few constant lights, I’m willing to bet that you can come up with some interesting results with just natural light too. If you really want to up the ante, throw your DSLR camera with fish eye lens up in the sky ala Mike Larson. I can’t find his wedding video at the moment but he demonstrates his unique portrait toss in the full post.

TimeFest 2011: Behind The Scenes With The Top Timelapse Shooters

Tom Guilmette is now a pretty regular name on Fstoppers because his BTSVs in the field of video are some of the best we have seen. In the video below Tom travels out west with Eric Kessler to film BTS footage of some of the top timelapse shooters of our time. My personal favorite is Tom Lowe and we haven’t heard much from him in the last year because he is still working on his timelapse feature film. Check out the video below to learn from the best.



Stop Motion Video Created With 2335 Prints

Stop motion videos are becoming increasingly more popular as digital cameras and software make them easier to create. Dave Wallace decided to make things quite a bit harder when he shot 2335 images, had them printed out, and then shot them a second time in picture frames on the wall. It took hours of work but the finished product is well worth the time. Check it out in the full post.


This Page Not Found Gets Quite Ugly

One of the unfortunate problems with running a website is you are inevitably going to send traffic to a misdirected URL or even worse a page that flat out doesn’t exist. You are probably used to seeing pages that look something like this. Well the guys over at Nosh.me came up with a funny little way to track down their own 404 pages and fix the issue or flat out take them down. Check out the final video below and hit the full post to see some BTS on how the guys conceptualized the scenes. If you really enjoy this sort of thing then you will find some really helpful tips about color grading, after effects, and detailed production notes over at the 404 process page. Who knew it was so violent behind each of our websites?

Nosh: 404 from Firespotter Labs on Vimeo.

The Focus Later Camera Shows Up On A Fashion Shoot

Remember the Lytro Camera that made it’s viral rounds a few weeks ago? The camera that lets you focus after you take the photo has finally showed its head. Photographer Eric Chen has apparently been given a prototype of the miracle camera to test and put through the ringer. Shockingly enough, Eric did not use the camera at all for macro or multi-layered compositions that would best suit the Lytro. Instead he went into the streets of New York to shot fashion shots of super model Coco Rocha with little more than a reflector for lighting. I’ll have to admit I wasn’t too impressed with the image quality from this camera even with Eric giving his best efforts. What do you guys think; is this “focus after you take a photo” technology from Lytro ever going to live up to its promise? Either way, be sure to check out Eric’s portfolio and and hit the full post to see the final Lytro images with variable focus points.

Utah Salt Flats: Photographing Capoeira With Natural Light And Strobe

Last time we featured a video from Mike Tittel, he was showcasing his edgy lighting look on some female tennis players. This time he has taken his photography team to the salt flats of Utah to photography the Brazilian sport Capoeira. For this shoot, Mike pulls out a few Profoto 7Bs with 2×3′ gridded softboxes for many of the shots. However it’s his natural lit shots that really grabbed my attention which he lit using the very helpful 4×6 California Sunbounce to fill his subjects. After the video, head over to Mike Tittel’s Website to check out more of his work and click on the full post to read how Mike lit these shots in his own words.

Photographing Rainbows and Moonbows At Yosemite National Park

This video was emailed to us and I when I watched it I thought “wow I’ve never seen anything like this before!” We’ve all seen rainbows and you’ve probably had your fair share of experiences taking images of them. What’s so interesting about this video is it showcases the elusive “moonbow” formed as moonlight passes through the mist created by waterfalls. Yosemite National Park is known for it’s amazing rock formations, waterfalls, and forests but few people know how beautiful it can look after the sun has set.

Sitex Computers: The Photoshop Of the 80s

Every now and then it’s fun to go back in time to see how photographers approached photoshoots requiring a large amount of production. Back in 1988 Brian King was on the cutting edge of digital photography with his use of Sitex imaging computers. Well before the advent of Photoshop, Brian was able to piece together multiple images by scanning negatives and turning them into primitive digital media. By today’s standards, the final product is pretty comical but this is what the first results of ‘digital photography’ looked like in the advertising world. I have to say, if a single photograph took this much effort and planning today I would probably have given up on commercial photography a long time ago.

Art or Pornography? The Life and Work of Sally Mann

Sally Mann is an American photographer who has pushed the limits of black and white fine art. Early in her career, Sally captured both real and staged moments of her children’s youth that quickly became subject of much controversy. Immediate Family, a collection of images of her children under the age of 10, showcased mainly normal, happy childhood moments. However other images featured her kids unclothed with themes of depression, anxiety, and even death. Obviously Sally’s work sparked strong emotions, and the debate about what is exploitation and what is art became synonymous with her name. The acclaimed What Remains: The Life and Work of Sally Mann is an interesting documentary that focuses on Sally’s work and how she approaches her craft. Now a praised nature photographer, Sally discusses her contraversal early images as well as many of her current projects including landscapes in the deep south and portraits of her husband as he deals with muscular dystrophy. Check out Sally Mann’s bookstore for great reading material from this revolutionary photographer. Click the full post for the full documentary.

Michael Levin: Master Of Black And White Landscapes

When I first saw this video I was completely blown away. Michael Levin is an outstanding black and white landscape photographer. Recently Michael teamed up with Brad Kremer to produce the most artistic behind the scenes video I’ve ever seen showing a day in the life of a photographer. I really really wish there was more technical information to this video but unfortunately like most landscape photographers their secrets are hard to pull from them. Brad shot this whole video on a Canon 5D Mark II and the highly praised Dynamic Perception Dolly. Michael is primarily shooting on a Hasselblad body but that shouldn’t come as any surprise. Make sure you check out Michael’s portfolio — much of his work features spectacular locations around Japan.

An Inside Look At Car Photography Post Production

Have you ever seen a car ad in a magazine and wondered “how did they do that?” The car itself seems to be glowing and the location is always perfect. I’ve always known that tons of photoshop is involved by I didn’t know if the car was actually shot in that location or if it was shot in the studio and dropped into the scene in post. In the case below, the car was shot on location and lit with a very simple rig (umbrella on a stick). The magic happens in Photoshop afterwards.



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