Nature and Femininity: Lilli Waters' Anja Series (NSFW)

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Nature and Femininity: Lilli Waters' Anja Series (NSFW)

Lilli Waters is a freelance photographer based in Melbourne, Australia. Her series “ANJA” features young women, often partially nude, in a mix of natural and domestic settings. Her subjects appear vulnerable, with faces often obscured or turned from the camera. Waters says the series is a “celebration and journey of femininity. ANJA means graceful, compassionate and kind, the way I see these women, my female peers.” Waters says she finds herself “fascinated with the constant beauty of nature around me, whether it be in the colours and textures in a fallen branch lying on the ground or an old house I pass by that looks like it would be a loving home.” Beginning the project on December 14, 2013, Walters says that it is going to be a longtime work in progress as she doesn’t want to finish it anytime soon. “The goal is to grow and make better and better portraits all of the time, to keep learning.”

More of Waters’ work can be found on her website.

Via iGNANT

 

12 Comments

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There are very few design elements used. This makes for simple and uninteresting photos to my eye. Not something that grabs me nor keeps my eye looking at the photos. Very little story telling here. The girl climbing on the concrete wall just looks like a snapshot. The last photo has some potential, but what is your story trying to tell? What do the branches add to the photo? Are they just there to keep with the theme?

Thanks for the insightful comments Nick! Like anyone cares about your criticism - if you don't like the photos just move on. What is the point to posting if you don't have anything positive to offer? If you don't like, or understand, a persons art then go make you own; be sure to post a link so other people can trash your work too!

The reason I made these critiques is because this is F-stoppers. There is usually a large variety of amazing work that is posted to this site, and to me this series of photos is not in the same level of photography. When you post your work online to a large website, people will critique your work. Most artists try and listen to critiques to help them grow and refine their work. The comments I posted are relevant to helping her create more depth in her work. If you want nothing but happy criticisms, go to a childrens finger painting exhibit. There are design elements that photographers use to help build amazing work, and most if not all famous and iconic photographs have a large number of these design elements in them. Shape, leading lines, rule of thirds, story, texture, color, depth, etc. These are what help create great photographs. The above photos have very few design elements in them, and I critiqued this.

Cris Magsino's picture

thats why i'd rather get constructive criticisms than silent "LIKE". You learn, grow and improve if you take negative comments as personal challenges :)

David Vaughn's picture

I don't think you really understand the point of a comment section.

And the "Let's see you do better," which is a very common argument on the internet it seems, falls flat because it does not address the original argument that these aren't great photographs. It's irrelevant.

wow, its like communism :). we say only positive things? since when is that a good thing? if the critique is based on just "like/dislike" factor - though it may be offensive - it has not big value and there is nothing much to care about, it only shows that a person is narrow minded. saying i like it and i don`t like it - has not much value for the work itself and artist if his willing to grow. it may give some inspiration though.
but if the negative critique is actually based on analysis of concept and its representation - than its always a positive things. fine art - is based and raised on negative critique. have you ever tried to get a contract with gallery? or get your photos to Paris Photo for example? some people rebuild themselves from scratch just to grow. its painful, but its real work.
photography is communication. and communication should be both ways.

Nothing wrong with Nick's comments. He's expressing a valid opinion, and he did it with at least some sort of analysis that, in the long run, could be beneficial to the shooter. I also tend to agree with him, though I don't think these are completely uninteresting. They have a raw quality I like, but they do seem to miss the mark.

Anyway, perfectly fine to make a critical comment as long as it's not simply, "These suck." Nick's comment seems to fit the bill.

Holy defensive fanboy, Batman. I had to scroll back to the top to see if this was your work!

If the members of F-stoppers were only interested in positive feedback and "attaboy"s, there wouldn't be a F-S. We'd all just post on our mothers' Facebook.

Calm down, junior.

Chris Cardoza's picture

The 5th one looks like a scene from Lars Von Trier's Antichrist

and yours look like a dozend others made decades ago.. so what?

They look like nearly every other retro-filter applied nude you can find on sites like deviantart.