Using Glass for Creative Photography Hacks

Lately, it seems as if I am seeing a lot of photos where the model or subject is seen through a window, for example, the shot where the model sitting inside a coffee shop enjoying a cup of coffee while the photographer snaps a photo from outside. If you are having trouble finding a location to do that, here's a hack for you to recreate a similar look.

Fstoppers Compares the Fujifilm XF 18-55mm f/2.8-4 and XF 16-55mm f/2.8

Fujifilm has become quite well known for it’s excellent APS-C lens lineup and now has enough lenses that several of them overlap significantly. One pair of lenses that bare consideration for many getting into the Fujifilm X system are the “kit” XF 18-55mm f/2.8-4 R LM OIS and the “professional” XF 16-55mm f/2.8 R LM WR. Let’s take a look at the differences between them.

Using Long Exposures Without the Help of Neutral Density Filters

You can get cool results when photographing water or cloudy skies with long exposures. For that you often need a filter that reduces the amount of light that enters the lens: a neutral density filter. But what if you don’t have such a filter? In that case there is another way to retrieve almost the same results. In this article I will explain how to shoot long exposures without the help of a neutral density filter.

Here's a First: A Photo Editor for Drone Images

This is a really good idea, and as far as I know it's an original one. The folks at Skylum, who have given us the Luminar and Aurora image editors, are today offering AirMagic, a Mac or PC app designed to apply AI (artificial intelligence) to any drone or aerial-based image you drop into the app, either a single image or a bunch of images. The app will be released March 21, but I got an early review copy and I'll share my impressions below.

Free Photoshop Action: NBP White Balance Adjust

Just about every photographer at some point has found themselves in a situation on set where the disparity between light temperature sources causes significant color casting in ways they don't want. In my experience, the most common problem is when you have to contend with traditional incandescent light bulbs in frame, but you're using strobes that are (mostly) balanced to average daylight light temperatures. What's the best way to fix this in Photoshop?