'A Runaway Success for Canon': A Review of the Canon EOS R7 Mirrorless Camera

It's been a fair while coming, but Canon's new EOS R7 is getting some rave reviews. This reviewer says it's been a "runaway success," so see what all the fuss is about.

The Canon EOS R7 was recently released by Canon and has been given glowing reports since it made its entry into the market. If you're not sure what the difference is between the R7 and other mirrorless R models, the biggest one is that the R7 has an APS-C sensor, as opposed to a full frame sensor on the likes of the Canon EOS R5. When I first started my journey in digital photography, I got a Canon with an APS-C sensor, mainly because it was cheaper, and at the time, I was a student on a budget. But it was also because I was mainly interested in shooting surfing at the time, and an APS-C sensor (on any camera) is great for shooting sports or wildlife because of the 1.5x or 1.6x crop factor, allowing you to get closer to your subjects. 

That brings us to this great new video by Christopher Frost, in which he reviews the recently released Canon EOS R7. What I really enjoy about Frost's reviews is that he is very measured and objective. He doesn't try to overwhelm his reviews with a big personality or editing bells and whistles. He simply takes a product and thoroughly reviews it, which is exactly what I want when I look at reviews. Here, he puts the new $1499 EOS R7 through its paces with a variety of different lenses, including some third-party lenses with an adapter. An interesting subplot is the fact that Canon has banned third-party production of some RF mount lenses. How might that impact your decision on this great new Canon camera? Give the video a look and let me know your thoughts.

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1 Comment
Milan Svítek's picture

The EOS R7 is an absolutely brilliant camera which, along with its little sibling the R10, are sorely held back by the lack of native lenses.

And not just RF-S APS-C lenses, but affordable THIRD PARTY options.
If the Tamron 50-400mm and 28-75 were available in RF mount; no questions, I'd be shooting an R7 TODAY.

It's a great camera, held back by Canon's greed.