This Is How Much Work It Takes to Make a YouTube Video

Consistently crafting compelling, professionally produced, and innovative YouTube content is no small feat, and you might be surprised by just how much work goes into even the smallest and most straightforward videos. This fascinating video takes a look behind the scenes at just what goes into making a YouTube video and the difficulties encountered along the way.

Coming to you from Becki and Chris, this interesting video takes a look at what it takes to make a YouTube video. Being a successful YouTuber can seem like a dream job and is something a large amount of creatives aspire to do. But putting out consistently good content on a regular basis is something that takes an incredible amount of work and skill, particularly as YouTubers have pushed the standards of production higher and higher, pushing audience expectations to new heights as well. This is one reason I have always appreciated people like Casey Neistat; I find their work ethic and ability to be consistently engaging really admirable. In the video, you will see not just what goes into the process, but also the sort of problems often encountered during the creation of a video. Check out the video above for the full rundown. 

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5 Comments

Rod Kestel's picture

Lots of character too. Next they'll make a vid about making a vid about making a vid....

Chris Fowler's picture

I watched this video last night. I can relate. I made a few cooking videos on my old channel and my wife would get upset at me for taking so long to cook dinner that I ended up filming the videos on a Saturday while she was out of the house on errands.

Here's how it was for me:

1. Set-up camera
2. Setup food prep
3. Record
4. Stop, review.
5. Repeat steps 3 & 4 while trying not to burn food.
6. Edit the video another day when you have hours to edit video down to 5 minutes
7. Post to YouTube
8. Get 12 views.

sigh.

My mother said if I couldn't say anything nice, I should keep my big mouth shut...

Hans J. Nielsen's picture

We appreciate their hard work, so we can lay on the couch watching good content.