Architecture

[Pics] Garbage Men Convert Dumpsters into Pinhole Cameras

This is the kind of project that I find exciting, inventive, and...kinda gross. A group of German garbage men are taking some pretty amazing pinhole photos using dumpsters as cameras. They simply drill a hole in the dumpster and expose the image onto a giant sheet of photo paper. Each shot requires about an hour long exposure. They even do all of their own

[Images] These Lego Tilt Shift Rooms Almost Look Real!

One of the tried and true techniques to making normal photographs stand out is to use a tilt shift lens and "miniaturize" your subject matter. Brazilian photographer Valentino Fialdini decided to put a unique spin on this lens trick and make the miniature world look lifesize. Using his tilt shift lens, Valentino was able to increase the depth of field in these tiny Lego rooms to make them look like normal building interiors. The illusion was accomplished by

[Video] Epic Timelapse Footage of Dubai by Richard Bentley

Here's a breathtaking perspective on the city of Dubai, created by UK filmmaker Richard Bentley. It took him two and a half weeks to capture the footage, shooting one to two sequences a day from various balconies and rooftops. He shot with a Canon 7D, and edited in Avid Media Composer. The final product is fascinating. The only problem I have with this video is that it reminds me that I have yet to see this city in person. That needs to change.

[BTS] The Anatomy of a Luxury Interior Shot

When it comes to interior and architectural photography, there is often much more involved than what meets the eye at first glance. In order to create a photograph that is realistic and enticing, careful planning, staging, lighting and a healthy dose of patience is imperative. In this Fstoppers Original, we dive into a luxury interior shot and see what it takes to construct a mouth-watering interior photo from the ground up.

[Video] "Lets Colour" Paints The World

Let's Colour is a worldwide initiative to transform grey spaces with colourful paint, and the results are quite incredible! This film was shot by Adam Berg over four weeks in Brazil, France, London and India. Every one of these locations has been transformed by a palette consisting of 120 different colours. The people in the film who rolled up their sleeves to transform their community with colour. I love this unity through art. Enjoy!

[FS Spotlight] Lisa Hubbard Keeps It Interesting: Chic, Playful Interiors and Still Lifes
When photographers think about their dream shoot, it usually has more to do with Angelina Jolie and a Ferrari than painstakingly positioning a piece of cooked cauliflower. Shooting interiors and still lifes can be notoriously difficult. And when done poorly, it can be downright boring... which is why I love photographer Lisa Hubbard and her work. Hubbard’s work is fresh and quirky, with a style and sense of humor that never gets old. Her impressive list of clients, including Anthropolgie, Absolut, Bon Appetit, Burberry, Kmart, and Martha Stewart, certainly agree. Check out this week’s FS Spotlight with Lisa Hubbard to get the scoop on her life as a successful interior and lifestyle photographer.

[BTS Video] Next Time You Photograph An Outdoor Building, Try This Technique
We are heading into the final stretch for our 2011 Behind The Scenes Contest and someone is about to win a truckload of gear! The latest video that caught my attention was from LA photographer Mike Kelley. Mike has been featured on our site before but in case you missed that post, his portfolio is full of some pretty kick ass commercial images of buildings and outdoor environments. So it was only fitting for his contest entry to showcase how he approaches an outdoor commercial architectural shoot. Mike uses a lot of exposures and some well thought out accent lighting to create a composite image that looks really nice. As much as I love this video, Mike won't win this competition by impressing anyone here at Fstoppers. Instead his video has to make a lasting impression among our celebrity panel of judges. If you have any questions for Mike, leave them in the comments below.

How To Light A Semi-Truck Against The Los Angeles Skyline
Jay P. Morgan is a commercial photographer based out in Los Angeles. His behind the scenes videos have been a hit with our readers because they always feature some useful lighting or photoshopping technique. In his latest video, Jay shuts down a highway ramp in order to light an 18 wheeler truck against the LA skyline. It's pretty interesting that an image like this is shot in camera and not completely photoshopped but that's what makes Jay P. Morgan a hero around the office. If you enjoy this video be sure to check out some of his other videos here.

Tips On Framing Interior Photography Shots By Scott Hargis
I was just sent a fantastic video by architectural photographer Scott Hargis. In the video Scott talks about framing a shot, something that I struggle with at every interior shoot I've ever had. It's very temping to shoot ultra wide so that you can see more of the room but as Scott points out, when you do you also loose the feeling of that room. Once you check out the video below head over to Scott's website to see what a great photographer is capable of.

How To Use Multiple Flashes To Photograph Buildings From Outside
Strobist has an interesting article by architectural photographer Mike Kelley. Usually exterior shots of homes and buildings are simply too large to effectively light with speedlights or big power packs. The tried and true method of capturing a great looking exterior shot is to turn all the lights on in the building and wait for the ambient sky light to match the build's artificial light. In the behind the scenes video below, Kelley shares his "selective lighting" technique and how it can be combined with multiple exposures from a small Canon 430EX to produce a sort of hero shot for publication. Click the full post for the final images.

A Look Into San Francisco's Past: A Trip Down Market Street 1906
Just like the story of Vivian Maiers, every now and then a discovery is made that not only brings a smile to your face but also sends a chill down your spine. Such is the story of the famous 1906 black and white film A Trip Down Market Street. For almost a century, historians have been trying to accurately date the short 13 minute film, and up until recently it was thought to have been shot in Sept 1905. When historian David Kiehn unveiled the truth about the film's date, everyone was shocked to learn that it was filmed in San Francisco just days before the devastating earthquake and sequential fire of 1906. The behind the scenes story on how the origin of the film was created is quite remarkable.