BTS

[Workflow] Three Pro Shooters Share Their Workflows

Having a professional photographer explain exactly how they made a photo from start to finish is something that will always interest me. Having three photographers do this is obviously even better. In this short interview series we get to peak over the shoulders of photographers Romain Laurent, Raïssa Venables and Mat Baker as they explain their individual workflows. Starting with their capture process and continuing on to their post production techniques.

[BTSV] An HDR, 35000 photo, 7 month Time-Lapse (for the love of it)

Here's a brief behind the scenes video featuring Andrew Geraci and Drew Breese in a Q&A regarding their haunting video, "Asylum". This HDR time-lapse was created from 35,000 photos over 7 months. If you missed this last week on Fstoppers, it's here in the full post. As the BTSV reveals, Drew and Andrew made this for no other reason than the love of shooting. That alone is worth your attention.

 [FStoppers Original] BTS Video With Surreal Portrait Photographer Rob Woodcox

I’ve always been amazed by artists who have the ability to take a vision of something that doesn’t actually exist, and then produce a surreal image of it in fine detail. One such artist is photographer Rob Woodcox, and this past winter I got the chance to capture some behind the scenes footage of a shoot he was working on, and also interview him about the project and his production processes. In the video, you’ll see the final image, and hear Rob provide some insight on the post-processing of his photos. Hit the jump for some more samples of his work!

[Video] Shooting The Ad Campaign For Discovery's River Monsters

Our good friend Blair Bunting is at it again. This time Blair was hired to shoot the ad campaign for The Discovery Channels hit show River Monsters. The concept was relatively simple; to have the show’s host Jeremy Wade wrestling a giant fish in the shallow waters near South Beach, Florida. To do this Blair's team used a fake fish that was then replaced in post. To freeze the water with a quick flash duration and stay portable Blair used the new Photoflex Tritons.

[BTS] Light Painting With WiFi?

Ok, so not technically WiFi, but the series of images in this video were shot using a specially designed pole with 80 bulbs that turned off and on depending on the signal strength of the WiFi in the area. It's a really interesting concept which is the result of a collaboration between Touch, a research project that investigates Near Field Communications and a London design company called Berg.

[BTS] Timothy White Shoots for "Cowboys and Aliens"

Well, It seems like the video doesn't allow embedding so everybody check it out HERE

This is a great behind the scenes video from Timothy White as he does the promotional photography for Cowboys and Aliens. I'll warn you, there's not much about the technical side of photography, a lot of these shots are done with natural light, but you can see most of his lighting set ups when he does use lights, and he talks at length about environmental portraiture and creating a dramatic image.

[BTSV] How to Shoot a Film With an iPhone

Ryan Connolly over at Film Riot, a how-to filmmaking site, just knocked out a short film using the iPhone 4s as his only camera. The best part is, he has also provided us with a very in-depth look at how he did. Everything from app set up, lighting, equipment, the works. See both the final video and the BTSV here.

"We took the challenge of making a short with the iPhone 4s. The goal was to make the iPhone's video mode look as cinematic as possible...

[Video + Pics] Mary Ellen Mark Shoots Prom Photos

How bad are your prom photos? Mine don't exist, since I never took part in the awkward American ritual (I had plenty of awkwardness in my day-to-day life). But I have always been intrigued by the whole idea of it. What does someone's prom photo have to say about who they were at sixteen? In this video, photographer Mary Ellen Mark captures the lives

[BTSV] Blast from the Past: Creating a Nat Geo Cover in the Studio

National Geographic recently released this video of the creation of one of their cover shots. While there is no exact date on it, I'd bet that it was shot sometime in the early 2000s or late 1990s guessing from technology being used. Some real ingenuity was at work here, as evidenced by the custom-built pneumatic jaw, the hand-cast Tyrannosaurus skull, and not to mention what appears to be at least ten cameras all triggered at the same time via laser in an effort to capture the decisive moment.