BTS

Behind The Scenes: Shooting The Master Of Horror

John Carpenter. His name is synonymous with fear. The films he has made in the last 40 years has been the cause of both delight and terror in several generations. 'The Thing' used to have me scrambling under the covers at night during my childhood while 'Big Trouble in Little China' had me laughing at jokes I was still too young to understand. Follow Kyle Cassidy as he photographs John Carpenter in the author's music room for his series of fantasy and science fiction writers in their creative spaces called: Where I Write.

Behind The Scenes:  How To Photograph The Olympics With Reuters

Earlier in the year, Fstoppers showed you how Sports Illustrated photographers photograph a superbowl. Just as the 2012 Olympics in London have come to a close, Reuters has released a behind the scenes video on how their photographers take images during the world's most celebrated sporting event. It's pretty interesting to hear from some of the industry's best photographers and editors as they race against the clock to send images to the wire.

This Pac-Man Fan Film Will Blow Your Mind (Behind The Scenes Video Too)

It's true, I have a soft spot in my heart for fan films, but this short is simply too good to ignore. James Farr took his passion and turned it into a script, and then over the course of a year was able to put together this project with the help of many other talented folks. This looks better than most video game movies Hollywood is putting out these days! Hit the jump for the Behind The Scenes Video!

A Bird's Eye View of Aerial Cinematography

Aerial Cinematography has always been a fascination of mine. Aerial shots tend to easily blow away normal stationary ground shots I find, but I've always wondered how people achieved such amazing footage and what they used. Follow Josh Lambeth from Birds Eye Productions as he sits down along with his crew and explains exactly what they use and how they use it to gain access to the sky and have their cameras airborne.

 Impressive Slow Motion Video Using The Sony FS700

With just $500 and 4 days to film, Luke Neumann of Neumann Films created one heck of a slow motion video with the new Sony NEX-FS700. What sets this video apart from all the others is that in at least every clip something or someone is flying through the air. With 24 frames per second we are able to see a ridiculous amount of detail captured on video. Check out Luke's review below to see what he has to say about rolling shutter performance, low light and resolution capabliiltes.

Matching Image With Sound For "The Dark Knight Rises"

One of the greatest experiences in watching films is when the sound and image work together in a cohesive unit that drives the intended emotions home for the viewers. Creating that experience takes the work of highly skilled professionals, like Hans Zimmer and Richard King. In this video, they discuss their workflow on the new Batman movie "The Dark Knight Rises", talk about Bane's voice, creating effects for the Bat, and give viewers a taste of what it's like...

How To Photograph A Spacedive: BTS With Red Bull

Red Bull is about to attempt a feat never accomplished before. Stratos is the name of the project where Red Bull will attempt to have Felix Baumgartner, an Austrian skydiver, free fall over 22 miles above the Earth and in the process break the speed of sound. The video shows the video and photography equipment, including 15 cameras, used to document the entire thing which is planned to go off around December.

Beneath The Diaper: A Hilarious BTS Interpretation Of Anne Geddes

By now, we have all heard of Anne Geddes, the photographer famous for capturing moments of babies dressed up in various outfits, posed on beautiful sets. The World instantly fell in love with her. No matter how difficult the job, she always makes it look easy. Have you ever wondered how she gets the shot and makes everything look so effortless? We finally get to see what it takes to make it in the baby photography arena.

How To Turn Sunlight Into Moonlight

In this behind the scenes lighting lesson, Jay P. Morgan of The Slanted Lens does something we might not often think to do: he uses the natural sunlight and turns it into moonlight-like light for this 1920's "speakeasy-themed" shoot. Believe it or not, he was able to achieve moonlight all in the camera - no post processing involved. So with a couple of tungsten lights, gels and sunlight, Jay P. has shown us a great idea that can easily be mimicked in your own shoot.