Film Photography

Gunther Holtorf Takes A 23 Year Long Road Trip And Documents The Journey

What started as an 18 month long tour of Africa, ended up lasting 23 year long but wonderful years. With his modest demeanor, we're finally hearing about his amazing journey across the World. He drove in a Mercedes Benz G Wagon and now has over 500,000 miles tacked on. The vehicle has traveled the equivalent of 20 times around the planet and the best part is that he took his cameras along with him! Gunther travels with 2 film cameras, including a Leica M6.

Group of Friends Photograph Themselves For 30 Years

With the emergence of digital photography , seeing timelapse of a person aging isn't all that crazy. But back in 1982, five high school friends took a group photo that they would recreate for the next 30 years. These photos, taken at Lake Copco in California, capture teenage friends John Wardlaw, John Dickson, Mark Rumer, Dallas Burney and John Molony as they reunited every 5 years at

Crappy Green Screen Footage? Fix It Like This!

I have been learning a ton of video know how in the past few months from watching the tutorials over at VideoMaker. I recently shot a green screen video for some background compositing and didn't take as much time as I should have setting up the lights for the green screen (the subjects on the other hand were flawlessly lit, haha). I thought I was out of luck until I came across this video which showed me how to fix my beginner's mistake and also has a few more handy tips for other green screen screw ups. Enjoy!

Fuji: Velvia No More

This is a sad day. While I don't foresee the end of the world, the Mayans tell us we still have time...it can still happen. Certainly, this being the third post about discontinued film since I started on Fstoppers just six months ago, this is the start of the photographers' Armageddon. But don't go hang yourself just yet -- there's just enough good news to keep me going just a little longer.

A Lesson In Composition For Video

Tom Antos is a freelance film maker who likes to share his tips and know how online with people just like you. In his latest lesson he addresses composition for film making and video. If you can get past the harsh audio you'll find that Tom really does have some great tips concerning composition and clues us in on when and how to use a certain camera angle or crop to get a certain feel, set a mood or to simply get your point across. Enjoy!

The Rising Of A Blockbuster: Making Of The Dark Knight Rises

Probably the most anticipated movie of the summer, The Dark Knight Rises, is sure not to disappoint. I have always been a long time fan of Christopher Nolan's style of film-making and his practical approach to filming special effect scenes. In this in-depth 13 minute making of featurette Christopher Nolan and his crew talk about the scope of filming a movie this size, the scale of the locations and how important it is to them to try to film all of their special effects in camera decreasing the amount of CGI used in post.

Behind The Scenes of Snow White And Huntsman

If you haven't seen the movie Snow White and the Huntsman, then you'll want to go see it after watching this video. Filmed with the Red Epic camera, the amount of detail that went into creating the Mirror Man is amazing. The guys over at The Mill Visual Effects Studio did many tests with liquid before deciding to use cloth instead. Cloth provided more control over making the sculpture appear seamlessly out of the mirror.

Great Explanation Of Frame Rates And Interlacing

When we as photographers jump into movie making using our newly video-enabled DSLRs, there is a lot of new info to learn and an entirely new vocabulary begins rearing its head. For me frame rates, shutter speeds, interlacing and how digital video all relates were a mystery, but thankfully the good ol' folks over at the Videomaker blog have answered these questions for us already. Check out this short video that will certainly help any new video guy (or gal) understand frame rates and interlacing. Enjoy!

Student Final Project: Swallowing 35mm Film

Two Kingston University students (in the UK), Luke Evans and Josh Lake, each swallowed 35mm film, allowed their bodies to 'process it,' and then collected and developed it both in a darkroom. They then scanned the film with an electron microscope to digitize the images. Despite the rather odd method of collection, I'm sure, the results are quite interesting...and I can't say I've seen anything like it.

NASA Creates Unintentional Art While Testing Space Suits

In the days before computer modeling, testing, and digital everything else, NASA had to come up with some pretty clever solutions to test and record results for their multitude of space programs. Using long exposures and creative light setups, they were able to record the results of their testing on their most technologically advanced space suits. And the result?