Historical

Interview With Magnum Photographer Christopher Anderson

Talented Magnum Photographer, Christopher Anderson, experienced something that completely changed his life. In June 2000, while traveling in Haiti, he met writer Michael Finkel and together they documented a group of 44 Haitians on their journey to the United States. A few days after they set sail, they realized the handmade boat was sinking. Anderson’s first reaction was to continue taking pictures – even though he knew there was a chance they may never be seen.

Ahead of His Time: Pablo Picasso Light Painting

We all know Pablo Picasso for his very distinct artwork and as one of the great masters. He is credited with creating the style of cubism and is considered one of the greatest artists of the last century, if not all time. I am personally a huge fan of Picasso, but mostly his Blue Period. What many of you may not know is that Picasso wasn't just a master of painting, he was also a gifted photographer. In this series, Picasso plays with light painting and shows us that what today we think is pretty cool, he had already toyed with over sixty years ago.

An Inside Look At The Louvre

With eight miles of galleries, the Louvre is still arguably one of the most grandiose museums in the world. When LIFE magazine photographer, Dmitri Kessel visited in 1953, he captured a glimpse of history in the making. His visit was just after the Louvre had been reorganized and redecorated to accomodate new additions to the vast collection.

Iconic Photos Of The Aftermath Of The Hiroshima Bombing

Yesterday marked the 65th anniversary of the dropping of an atomic bomb on Hiroshima. After the bomb was dropped, censorship of the event was a priority in both Japan and abroad, and journalists were barred from entering, reporting, or photographing the area. Yoshito Matsushige was living just outside of the blast radius, and snapped some of the only known photos of the aftermath. They are a grim reminder of the event, a testament to the power of a photograph, and a testament to the gruesome reality of World War II.