Portraits

Shooting Senior Portraits Outdoors With A Single Light

In another great behind the scenes video from Michael Sasser, Denver Photographer Ryan Tortorelli is shown working with three students at several different locations to capture there senior portraits. Using what seems like a single light setup in conjunction with the sun, the resulting captured images show the quality of this setup. It's also great to see how Ryan is working with his talent, suggesting poses and giving directions.

The Sexy Bottle Shoot- How to Photograph Glass

Alex Koloskov has had a few of his behind the scenes videos featured here on fstoppers. In this charismatic behind the scenes video, Alex takes the photography assignment of shooting some liqueur bottles in an attractive way and walks us through his set up. His in depth explanation of the lighting and staging process gives you a great understanding of how he got his final "sexy" shot.

Peter Hurley's Google+ Keynote: How To Take The Perfect Headshot

If you are a regular reader of Fstoppers then you know how many times I've said this, "Peter Hurley has changed the way I photograph people more than anyone else". During his Google+ Conference Keynote Presentation, Peter explains why it is the photographer's job to make every person look amazing while they are in front of their camera. Photographers cannot rely on a model's good looks, perfectly crafted lighting, their own technical prowess, or old fashioned luck

These Woman Only Look Beautiful Upside Down

Don't believe this is the same image? I didn't either and that's why I created an animated gif to prove it. The Thatcher effect is a phenomenon where it becomes difficult to detect local feature changes in an upside down face. This strange human glitch was named after Margaret Thatcher, whose image this was first tested on. These images were taken by Anuschka Blommers and Niels Schumm for the new Dove Campaign. You'll have to watch it a few times to believe it for yourself.

Unseen 1980s Photos of Staten Island by Christine Osinski

Photographer Christine Osinski took these images of Staten Island in 1983 and 1984. Back then she was shooting with a Linhoff lens on a 4×5 camera. I'll admit, my experience in Staten Island is limited to a few rides on the ferry. But there is something so captivating about this series. These are ordinary people, living their lives in what could be any town in America. But they are in fact, residents of New York City's 'forgotten borough.'

Behind the Scenes: James Mollison Shoots Portraits at a Kenyan Refugee Camp

James Mollison is known for his photojournalistic portraiture. He often photographs his subjects in front of a white backdrop, and then presents the final portrait next to a picture of the persons's living conditions. In this video, he'll speak about his previous projects; but you'll also get see him in action. He goes to a Kenyan refugee camp and captures some beautiful and somewhat disheartening images of the inhabitants.

A Cheap DIY Alternative To Peter Hurley's Kino Flo Lighting

Everyone knows Peter Hurley uses fairly expensive Kino Flo lights to give his clients nice soft beauty lighting. Fstoppers reader Tristan Penner decided to build a portable and inexpensive alternative to Peter's setup using standard Fluorescent lights. The setup might not improve too much on the portability but the quality of light does look really nice. What's really cool is Tristan is able to travel to people's homes with this setup bypassing the

Smoking Kids Portraits by Frieke Janssens

I was really taken aback when I came across this series of images by Frieke Janssens. They're so incredibly striking, and I imagine it's difficult to look at them without being affected in some way. The video shows some behind the scenes footage, and ends with the clip that inspired the entire series. Here's an excerpt from Janssens' website, where she explains the inspiration for the project

Will Video Cameras Kill Still Photography? Red Epic Vs Hasselblad

UPDATED WITH PETER'S Full RES FILES! New cameras are getting faster and faster each year. In over a decade DSLRs have gone from 6 fps to 12 fps, and now many can shoot 60 frames of HD video. We've all heard it before, "At some point photographers will just shoot video and pull the best frame out" but is this really even feasible? Fstoppers.com recently teamed up with Peter Hurley to test this theory as we compared the Hasselblad H3D-22 with the Red Epic. The results are shocking!

Gigantic Living Grass Portraits Created with Photosynthesis

I can honestly say that I have never seen anything like this before. The England-based artistic collaboration of Heather Ackroyd and Dan Harvey (a.k.a. Ackroyd & Harvey) have been creating large grassy portraits with the use of photosynthesis. They exposed the grass to the sun through large custom-made negatives, creating different tones from yellow to green. It's a breathtaking concept that I would love to see in person.