6 Editing Skills Every Landscape Photography Should Have

Making a good landscape photo is just as much about the editing process as it is about shooting it. While everyone has their own style, there are certain fundamental editing skills every photographer should know, and this great video will show you what they are and how to use them. 

Coming to you from Mark Denney, this fantastic video details six different editing techniques every landscape photography should know how to employ. One of the techniques that I think does not get utilized enough is split toning. A lot of newer photographers leave the panel completely untouched in Lightroom, but it is important to remember that color toning is one of the best ways to add a personal touch to photos. Furthermore, just a light touch of split toning can add a lot of atmosphere to a photo. The important thing to remember (especially with any color adjustments) is to keep it subtle and not go overboard. Try stepping away from your screen for a minute after you're done editing before you evaluate the image one more time before exporting. Check out the video above for the full rundown. 

And if you really want to dive into landscape photography and editing, check out "Photographing The World 1: Landscape Photography and Post-Processing with Elia Locardi." 

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10 Comments

chris bryant's picture

Over cooked?

Joel Manes's picture

Looks really nice on my screen, but taste is personal.

Chris Rogers's picture

Another good term is "Deep Fried"

Ed Kennedy's picture

Entirely over processed for me....looks nothing like the original. But to each his/her own.

Les Sucettes's picture

Pretty artificial

Michel Higuet's picture

If you have bad taste don't hesitate to over cook your photo... Ugly!

William Connor's picture

I appreciate that many people have clients that have specific requirements that necessitate editing. Got to be honest though it's like being a welder. If you have to grind every weld you make you're a grinder and not a welder. If you edit every photo you take you're a photo editor, not a photographer.

Editing a photo like this video does is akin to lying in my mind. The lighthouse light is unrealistic and no real light source will look like the final image. Marketing will love it until people actually go there and share that it looks nothing like that.

It's an unpopular opinion but it's mine.

Les Sucettes's picture

Totally agree with welding / grinding analogy. Good one.

To your last point - the one about marketing - it’s just a bit off in that the image looks awful actually. With the right light the location would look much better.

The image was a scounting shot and should’ve remained one. Mark, the editor, should go back und photograph it when the light is right to become Mark, the photographer.

William Connor's picture

The location would certainly be more realistic and welcoming with the right light and its own natural beauty.

Cecilia Marsh's picture

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