Series Creates Dreamlike Black and White Landscapes Through Lengthy Exposures

Series Creates Dreamlike Black and White Landscapes Through Lengthy Exposures

Greek fine art photographer Vassilis Tangoulis creates beautiful, dreamlike landscapes through lengthy exposures in his black and white series “Misty Scapes;” incorporating the “fourth dimension” of time into his work. Over the course of the exposures, fog swirls around a tree, a boat, or a grouping of rocks; erasing smaller details in the surrounding landscape to highlight the central subject.

A working chemist and professor at Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, Tangoulis describes himself as leading a “double career” in both science and the arts. Focusing on the symbolic nature of his photography, Tangoulis states that he works with collections of photographs, always shooting with a specific concept in mind. Inspired by the Ansel Adams quote, “When words become unclear, I shall focus with photographs. When images become inadequate, I shall be content with silence.” Tangoulis states that he will not begin to shoot without a concept or clear message to be communicated.

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While Tangoulis says he is “open” to color photography, he states that his work is almost 80% black and white. The major impetus for shooting the majority of his work in black and white is Tangoulis’ belief that black and white photography “has more color than color photography because the multiple variations of possible grays, if treated correctly, reveal much more depth and drama than color can offer.”

You can find more of Vassilis Tangoulis’ work on his website.

All images used with permission.

Via [Exposure Guide]

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11 Comments

Nice. I wonder how he did the one for the horse though... :)

a good taxidermist... ;)

oic. Thanks!

"Tangoulis states that he will not begin to shoot without a concept or clear message to be communicated."
While I can see "concept" in these images, and they are really quite lovely and beautiful work, I'm not seeing any "message".

"...Tangoulis’ belief that black and white photography “has more color than color photography because the multiple variations of possible grays, if treated correctly, reveal much more depth and drama than color can offer.”

This guy's spent too much time in Ansel Adams world. It's easy to get caught up in that crap. Years back in the '70s I used to be a real Adams aficionado. I even bought an (expensive for the time) autographed book of Yosemite images. I marveled at the great 10-tone shots of rocks, sky, trees, and then I got to a perfect 10-tone shot of........a rainbow.

I never shot another black & white shot ever again.

James Nedresky's picture

You seem to be quite the critic. So how come I don't see your work published here?

What of his work did I criticize?

I'm sure you critic uyour government from time to time.... have they ever say you in office? No?

Same goes here.

Great work by Vassilis. Hope to be in the list 1 day :)
https://www.flickr.com/photos/boostinspiration/

Brian Zed's picture

I like the mood and the concept behind the images! Really! - but i do not like the quality of the images.
In my opinion they obviously look too photoshopped.
The important areas were edited in post - nothing to say about it, but e.g. Image 1, 3 and the second last image are too overdone. I am the only one, who think this?

JOE DDD (Daniel Dalin Drechsler)'s picture

beautiful stuff. :) really good.

Chris Blair's picture

The images are wonderful, although I do feel like I see this trend everyday poping up on my 500px Flow. I always hit the like button, but I feel like it's almost getting old at this point. That's one of the problems with instant access to everyone's images, now we get tired after seeing a beutiful concept only a few dozen times...it really makes it harder and harder to be original and amazing when your showing your work in public. Sorry, this was just a personal observation on digital photography in general, the images are wonderful though.