Take A Look At How Fine Artist Nicholas Scarpinato Views The World

Take A Look At How Fine Artist Nicholas Scarpinato Views The World

Coming from a fine art background I tend to be very fascinated by conceptual work. It took me a long time to start to understand the context of what fine art is and how simple or complex can be. It is commonly misunderstood and often overlooked especially with the growing interest and demand in commercial photography. To say I even fully understand it now would be nothing short of a lie, but I believe we should all open our minds to the confounding world of fine art. Nicholas Scarpinato knows how to construct some rather engaging work. I can't help but be sucked in to the fantasy world each of his photographs portray.
"My love of photography began at a young age with a camera my parents had at their home. What I choose to photograph is images that tell a story, a secret that is waiting to be unearthed, a memory or a place in time. While the initial photographic capture is important, the ensuing creative process is the distinguishing factor in my work. My images are designed to expand the intellectual limits of surreal photography. I am currently a student at Virginia Commonwealth University, majoring in Film and Photography. Some of my recent recognitions include: Nees and Voss, used one of my photos for their single cover “Burn Me Down.” My work is currently being showcased at FOODE, titled “Instruments of Memory.”
I work digitally, with drawing and/or painting included in the some of my images." Visit his Website or 500px to view more of his work.


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6 Comments

Blowing the cloud is my personal favorite of the bunch

Aurélien Calonne's picture

Very inspiring, thanks for the discovery !

Michael Wessel's picture

Wow, talk about inspiring. Thanks for putting this up! Time to head to the drawing board for my next shoot :)

Some of this is reminiscent of Robert Parke-Harrison's work. Quite lovely.

I see a heavy influence from Robert Parke-Harrison's work, The Architect's Brother.

Amazing!!