Fujifilm Announces the XF 50mm f/1.0 R WR: Autofocus, Huge Aperture, Weather Sealing

Fujifilm Announces the XF 50mm f/1.0 R WR: Autofocus, Huge Aperture, Weather Sealing

Fujifilm has announced the new XF 50mm f/1.0 R WR lens, dubbed the “world’s first autofocus lens with a maximum aperture of f/1.0.”

While definitely not a featherweight, the lens is relatively light at 1.86 lb (845 grams). It measures 4.07 inches (103.5mm) in length, 3.43 inches (87mm) in diameter, and like all other XF lenses, it is weather sealed, allowing it to be used under demanding conditions when paired with the right camera.

The lens will be available in the next month or so at a price of $1,499.95. The angle of view is equivalent to 76mm in 35mm format.

Victor Ha, Fujifilm’s senior director of marketing and product management, describes it as “an incredible tool for visual storytellers.” With such a wide maximum aperture, the autofocus “can achieve critical focus at very shallow depth of fields,” even under incredibly low lighting conditions. Fujifilm states that it can lock autofocus at a luminance level of -7EV when paired with the X-T4 or X-Pro3.

FUJINON XF50mmF1.0 R WR Lens
FUJINON XF50mmF1.0 R WR Lens
FUJINON XF50mmF1.0 R WR Lens
FUJINON XF50mmF1.0 R WR Lens

9 aperture blades create a rounded diaphragm in order to deliver smooth bokeh. 12 elements sit in nine groups, including one aspherical element and two extra-low dispersion (ED) elements in order to control spherical aberration. Here are the specifications in full:

  • Focal length: 50 mm
  • Image stabilization: No
  • Maximum aperture: F1
  • Minimum aperture: F16
  • Aperture ring: Yes
  • Number of diaphragm blades: 9
  • Optics: 12 elements in 9 groups
  • Minimum focus: 0.70 m (27.56″)
  • Maximum magnification: 0.08x
  • Autofocus: Yes
  • Full time manual: Yes
  • Focus method:Internal
  • Distance scale: No
  • DoF scale: No
  • Weight: 845 g (1.86 lb)
  • Diameter: 87 mm (3.43″)
  • Materials: Magnesium alloy
  • Sealing: Yes
  • Colour: Black
  • Filter thread: 77 mm
  • Hood supplied: Yes

To give greater accuracy, the manual focusing ring has a throw of 120 degrees.

Will you be pre-ordering? Let us know your reactions in the comments below.

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22 Comments

John Xantoro's picture

It's fine to push out those halo-products once in a while and equivalency discussion aside, having the first f1 AF lens is certainly a noteworthy accomplishment.
Having said that, I hope Fuji updates their lens roadmap and fills out the gaps (tele) and updates their old lenses with WR and faster AF. They seem to be slacking quite a bit lately.

Stuart Carver's picture

Apparently 3 more lenses are coming soon, an update to the 10-24 lens, an update to the 27mm pancake and also a brand new 70-300 f4-5.6 lens.

Kurt Hummel's picture

I’m pretty sure Canon had a 50mm 1.0 with auto focus 30 years ago.

Stuart Carver's picture

People keep misquoting the press release, it states the first 'mirrorless' f1.0 lens with AF on there.

Herco le Fevre's picture

Aren't most lenses 'mirrorless'...? ;-)

Stuart Carver's picture

True, but you get the jist :)

Kurt Hummel's picture

That makes sense. I’ll guess it was put out in Japanese and the translation wasn’t perfect.

Stuart Carver's picture

The press release on Fujirumors seems to be correct, it’s just all these YouTube channels etc have dove in and not proof read or vetted what they are saying.

Lawrence S's picture

Good for Fuji - I am always a supporter of underdog camera brands - and people using Fuji system. But as mainly Nikon fullframe user this is somewhat underwhelming. The images that this lens will give are not much different than a 75mm F1.5. So not much different than a widely available F85 1.4 portrait lens in terms of view angle and depth of field. And also not so versatile als the rumoured 35F f1.0 they were first making - that would have been a gem. I would have considered that one if it didn't cost 2000€, for my modest Fuji X-E3 kit for on-the-go. So basically it's more of an update of the 56mm F1.2. Fingers crossed Fuji made their homework in the parts were it matters: bokeh, microcontrast, sharpness wide open.

Ryan Cooper's picture

Underwhelming is relative. Fuji users who have been clamouring for a fast portrait prime that gives them a FF-like composition are probably super excited for this. Not every product needs to be revolutionary in the industry as a whole for it to be a compelling product. Within the Fuji echo system, assuming the lens is good, this is a big win.

Lawrence S's picture

That's basically what I said in the first line?
Not relatively, more like objectively. Because Fuji already offers a 56mm F1.2, which is not extremely different in output of this lens. I would argue that this is going to offer Fuji owners (like myself) something that was not possible with the 56mm F1.2 - apart from a much beefier lens, a slight improvement in DOF and other areas (AF, WR,...)

But we'll still have to wait for samples and reviews. But it's clear that this is not a workhorse lens that will sell amazingly, it's more like a PR lens. Just like Nikon's F0.95 Noct for Z mount.

Stuart Carver's picture

The problem is, your Nikon lenses won’t fit on my fuji camera so all this comparison is nonsense.

Lawrence S's picture

Well, that's your problem. Not mine or anyone's else. My Nikon, Hasselblad and Pentax lenses all fit my Fuji body with an adapter.
Also, Fuji sells its lenses with the full frame equivalent in mind.

Stuart Carver's picture

Nice flexing but it doesn’t detract from the fact that all equivalence does is provide trolls with nonsense figures to argue about and beginners pointless shit to worry about that means nothing to real world photography, you learn how to use the lenses on your system... and literally nobody on earth is stood in the field with their camera thinking ‘oh if only I have XYZ camera and lens the shot would look like this’, nobody.

Lawrence S's picture

I not sure why you are defending this like it's the only truth when everybody else with more than one lens in their bag IS actually thinking about how a shot would look if they used lens X or lens Y and choose accordingly. Unless you only use one big 18-300mm zoom. Also, people looking at buying a lens for a particular purpose are asking either a salesman or a community online what lens they should buy and which one not. With any sensor smaller (or bigger, sometimes) than full frame, this almost always is explained with the aid of full frame equivalents. Especially if you have brand that has both product lines, aps-c and full frame. It's your own valid opinion to think this is all BS, but it can't be that hard to diggest that this is not the case for the majority.

Stuart Carver's picture

I’m not talking about different lenses for the same system and choosing one.. I’m talking about a system that only has one single sensor size on its own mount (fujifilm X), a system that no other lenses natively fit to, equivalence is complete nonsense because all these ‘alternatives’ don’t fit on the mount, so all this talk about equivalent depth of field and light gathering is all just shit that spreadsheet forum warriors use to argue about whilst the real photographers get on with using their equipment.

Your ‘widely available 85mm f1.4’ doesn’t help a Fuji user because they have no camera to fit it to.

Lawrence S's picture

What planet are you from? Equivalence is one of the most asked about topics by beginners everywhere. People asking about whether a 24mm wide angle is wide enough on their aps-c body, people hearing about at "standard" lens and looking for one for their aps-c body. And then people explain that they need to look for a 35mm, not a 50mm. People asking about the lens they found in their grandpa's attic and how it will work on their camera. People switching sensor formats or brands and asking for good equivalents. The internet is full of discussions about equivalence, including this website. You know that, I know that. Everybody knows that. So why keep that stance, saying it is not important? That it's just, I quote "nonsense figures for trolls and spreadsheet forum warriors"?
I don't mind responding to questions about the topic, from friends, colleagues or strangers. Unless I am at work. Looking at the tone of your replies, you don't seem to be that type. That's okay.

Stuart Carver's picture

A massive example of why it’s nonsense. On one of the Fujifilm Insta channels somebody called them liars and exploiting a marketing gimmick by calling a lens F1.0 that’s actually F1.6 and they needed to be called out for lying to people. Until there are only sensible people left who are willing to talk about the subject sensibly in relation to field of view and nothing more the subject will be complete nonsense. Comparing ‘Bokeh’ is nonsense due to all the other factors involved in what makes a background blurry (outside of how large the aperture is), all this light gathering rubbish is nonsense, people rattling on about photons per pixel area or whatever crap they talk about (I have neither the time or energy to read into it).

Once all the above morons have been flushed out, leaving only people comparing field of view and nothing more, then I’ll accept that the discussion is relevant. Until then the best thing everyone can do is ignore the whole lot, take their lenses and cameras and learn how they work to achieve the results they want to get.

Les Sucettes's picture

Nikon will fold. Quick sell your Nikon gear while it’s still worth something

Lawrence S's picture

Whatever happens, nobody is going to stop producing lenses or cameras with F of Z mount. That would be idiotic.

Herco le Fevre's picture

To me it seems like a nice 'showcase' product with limited value to most Fuji shooters. Like most Fuji lenses it will have very good image quality, but at roughly twice the street price and size of the 56/f1.2, you must have a very good reason to buy one. For now I'm staying with my 56 and 90 for portraits and fashion (and the A7RIV).

A few things struck me when seeing the lens and reading the press release. Just a few suggestions for the next version of lenses:
(1) it still has that horrible cheap looking plastic lens hood similar to the 56 and the 90. The bayonet is prone to getting looser over time and the lens hood coming off when carrying the camera on a strap near your hip. Even Sigma's nowadays have a sturdy lens hood with a lock button;
(2) there's still no Fn button for e.g. focus hold on the lens (minor, but still handy on a lens this size);
(3) there's still no aperture lock for making sure the ring sticks to the given aperture (incl. A). Many of my Fuji lenses have quite loose aperture rings that are easily knocked off position. Hopefully this lens has a stiffer ring that stays like that over time;
(4) a 'de-clickable' aperture ring for video-shooters.

Anyway, I'm more looking for MkII versions of the most important lenses in Fuji's line-up. Esp. the fast 23 and 35, but also for the 56 as a 50 and a 56 is quite a difference when you work in a studio setup. There's a reason why the 85-105 range is called portrait lenses. These lenses give the most flattering head shots. The 75 (FF eq.) for some set-ups is too short. E.g. when you have a complex light/reflector setup that gets in between. I'd therefore really love to see a fast 60 or 70mm from Fuji to complete the range. Doesn't have to be f1,0...

TOMASZ WK's picture

As for myself, I’m really interested by this lens, I don’t have the 56mm lens and don’t mind the 75mm equivalence or the weight. It’s even better if you want to use it in tight spaces. It has a fast AF, WR and some reviewers say that the lens is sharper than the 56mm wide open. I don’t mind the price.