Adobe Photoshop CC Has Already Been Pirated In Just One Day

Adobe Photoshop CC Has Already Been Pirated In Just One Day

With all the recent discussion about Adobe's Creative Cloud model and the polarizing opinions surrounding it, one of the topics people have been mentioning is how it will stop the pirating of Photoshop and other Adobe products in the suite. Some felt that many people were just upset with the model because it could no longer be pirated by those who did not pay. 

Now that Photoshop Creative Cloud went live just the other day, we didn't know what to expect. However, news is out that just a day after the release, Photoshop CC has already been pirated and available. Although we do not condone piracy, we're shocked to see that it was that easy to circumvent the new model. The reason is how CC works, “An Internet connection is required the first time you install and license your desktop apps, but you can use the apps in offline mode with a valid software license. The desktop apps will attempt to validate your software licenses every 30 days.”

With the constant need for validation and continual updates through the cloud, many felt it would be difficult to pirate something that requires constant contact for it to stay updated. However, it took no less than a day for pirates to get around it.

We're not engineers by any means, however you would think that any means of pirating the software would have been cross checked so it would not be possible this time around. Considering Photoshop is one of the most pirated software in the world, is it by design that makes it so hard to stop? We'd like to hear your thoughts.

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301 Comments

everything that hurts adobe makes me smile these days.....

Give the software away...make it less about ease and more about the professional tools and sell a s*@% load of books and classes on how to use it.

...on 2nd thought people would just steal the books and pirate the online video classes... ;)

Thanks for the heads up, nerds. I'm downloading it now.

I saw an interesting comment on macintouch.com:

Because of all the updates to cloud versions I called Adobe to seriously
inquire about purchasing a subscription. I learned that after you cancel
your subscription, nothing you have will continue to work, and you have to
go back to any version you might still have on your computer before this
all started.

He told me about a 1 yr. $20/mo. deal, and I told him I was aware that
after the year promo, the price would become $50/mo. He said if I give
him my email, he'll get me started with links and enrollment. I paused.
He asked if I was ready to enroll now, and I said I'm happy to give him
my email for information, but I have some thinking to do regarding this
monthly fee that would obsolete my products totally if I stopped paying
it.

He asked again if I was ready to enroll now. I said I'm not sure. He
hung up on me. Literally. Not even a goodbye.

In his defense, he probably gets that answer from ALLOT of people. :)

Fstoppers logic: Accuse subset of readers of being "too cheap to pay for software" in other article; inform that cracked version is available on the web.

Dude makes a lot of crazy sense man, WOw.

www.Go-Anon.tk

All this means is Adobe is free to change their DRM to stop further downloads and that pirated copy isn't going to get any new features. (In 10 years, you can choose from pirated copies of Photoshop CC 2017-02-10, Photoshop CC 2019-04-23, or Photoshop CC 2021-06-08.)

I stopped upgrading PS several versions ago. I'm an amateur, not a pro, so PS doesn't 'earn' any money for me. It has become a burdensome expense, and considering how rarely I use the more esoteric features, PS became a luxury item. As such, it has to compete (in my budget) with the necessities and other luxuries.

I don't condone piracy, but if the new pricing model suggests anything, it suggests we've all paid WAY too much for previous versions.

If you work out the cost over the average time between major upgrades, the subscription model will generally end up costing more. And it means there's less incentive for Adobe to keep coming out with upgrade-worthy new features.

Wow. Just... wow.

I used to pirate every piece of software that struck my fancy. I would use it, unrestricted and if I didn't like it, I would never use it again. If I did like it, I used the hell out of it and made my reel with it. When I was hired, they asked me what I used on this reel. I told them and they bought everything from hardware to software.

Get it into the hands of young people. If you have a great product, they will use it and when they become professionals, they will demand it. How do you think Adobe has the market share that it has now? I remember in the 90's, all you had to do was put in a serial number off the web.

I was pretty happy to read some of the anti-piracy comments on here.

I am the cinematographer on a low budget indie movie that has blown up. Even though the film actually looks like a financial success, as it is doing very well on VOD charts, I can tell you that piracy has been absolutely devastating. More people will steal my movie in the next hour than will rent it all week.

We expected piracy, we just didn't expect more than 50 times the people stealing it than renting for $4. I mean, this is where we are now? There's arguments that can take that number way down, but you can't convince me that even just one of those 50 people wanted to see the movie and could have paid. Then we'd have double the customers.

As a filmmaker, I have a movie in top 5 of iTunes in its genre, and we did it without a studio... Just a group of 6 people, unpaid for over 2 years... We have attained our dream, but it has actually depressed me greatly. Our movie was so cheap, so we're guaranteed to make our money back, but with the current attitude toward piracy, I'm realizing that this business is not a viable career option without getting into bed with studios. We're talking very, very small returns here. If I wanted to do a $50,000 movie without a studio, I don't know if we could ever make that back. Honestly I'm confused as to how our numbers can be what they are, and yet beat movies with budgets in the millions and no theatrical release.

The idea that pirates are sticking it to the man... Corporations, studios, whatever... Right now they are sticking it to THIS man, just sitting in his modest rented house with his wife, working on freelance food photography to pay the bills as my "hit" movie has been stolen at least 50,000 times in the past two weeks. I'd convert the pirates to DVD sales though, if we didn't just lose our DVD contract due to the higher than average rate of piracy. (Their words).

By the by, the movie was edited on a legitimate copy of Production Premium CS5.5 which I added to my Design Standard license. Been a Creative Cloud member since CS6 and love it because I've had to use a little of everything to help promote the movie. Never needed Dreamweaver before but it came in handy. I can understand the frustration from people who only use 2 programs though. It's hard for me to be too judgmental of Adobe because I have two careers that fully rely on their software and I think the price is justified for what I make in my photography and design career... Filmmaking, well you know my thoughts about that.

But the problem is, when you fall on hard times or simply don't have the money each month for subscription, you're screwed because the software will stop working as soon as you stop subscription. After renting your software for all that time, you will have nothing to show for it. Nothing. Previously you could own what you needed and not have to worry about it since you budgeted for it. Now, that choice is gone.

Also, regarding the marketing of your film and discovering different methods on how to do so, check out "Think Outside The Box Office: The Ultimate Guide to Film Distribution and Marketing For The Digital Era" by Jon Reiss. VERY educational from someone who has actually done it.

Good luck!

I assume that most of the people on here are designers of some sort, so I would love to know from those who pirate the software how they feel when a client decides not to pay for a design they have created.

in some countries people do not have access to dollars, or credit cards to pay adobe and they are force to download a crack version of the software!!!...and anyway I think that adobe has not much impact on there earnings am sure more people pay the license to adobe that the one´s don´t pay, but that's not an excuse of course.

See my post below about how my movie, currently in the top 5 of several genres on iTunes gets pirated at 50 times the rate that people legitimately rent it. A few weeks ago I would have said piracy had a 1:1 ratio at worst and I was horribly wrong. Just one single illegal streaming site is showing that they streamed my movie more than 5 times than it was rented since release. And that's just one of a thousand of these streaming sites, and doesn't include megaupload type sites and torrents. It's absolutely insane to see. The number one referrer to my movie's official website is a piracy site I've never heard of called horrorcinemaflix or something. Now I know why Hollywood is pushing garbage sequels and reboots in 3D... Even small arthouse movies get stolen to death, only they are the ones that no longer have a theatrical model to give them a fair shot before the piracy begins.

Oh, and I don't mean that to read in an angry tone toward you or anything, I saw that you said it's no excuse, so you're cool.

No one is forcing you to download the software, it's entirely up to you. There are free alternatives out there and there is no valid excuse for piracy. Maybe consider a career that doesn't require expensive software? Also these people manage to pay for a computer and internet access or is that just because it's harder to steal?

I'm totally on Christian Stella's side on this issue.

Don't forget that especially for people on this site, piracy of software creates cheap and sub-par competition for companies that don't know the difference.

Microsoft windows, Microsoft office, Adobe Photoshop... all these apps are a monopoly because they are easy to pirate. And Microsoft and Adobe know it.

Adobe with his CC it's nothing about it. It is about the cloud and the dependence or subordination of legal users. You must pay year after year to continue using his products. CC is about dependency not piracy.

Serious question, for those that refuse to pay for CC due to the subscription model, why not buy a new license to CS6 and steal CC? You're showing Adobe that there is a market for non-subscription and you are essentially paying for CC at the same time. If you think that's a silly idea, maybe you just need to admit that you want the software for free.

Because for me, I have no problem with people "trading in" a DRM movie for a non-DRM movie. If you paid, you paid.

How is that going to help anything? IN a year to two you won't be able to open your CC files using CS6. In fact even now there are some features of CC that you can't access in CS6. Much of the whole point of being angry with Adobe is this they are offering subscription ONLY. Let them start selling the perpetual licenses of CS7 and then CS8 and so on and we'll be just fine. It's the removal of CHOICE from Adobe that is annoying.

MS and Adobe know there software is pirated a lot and they don't care as much as you think. They both care about the Enterprise. That's where they make there money. Companies like Microsoft need piracy. That's why they never sue individuals for it. The important thing is to get young people to use the software so when they graduate college and get jobs, they convince their employer they need PhotoShop, or Visual Studio instead of the free alternatives. Enterprise business fills MS and Adobe's wallets.

(For the record, I'm a Creative Cloud subscriber)

Of course, the flipside of this is that a) since they've evidently adulterated the code to get around the online licencing check, you'd have to wonder what other additions the hackers may have made, b) your Photoshop CC is going to be frozen in time, as it won't get any future updates. Since Adobe *are* updating their software a lot more regularly these days, that could add up to a lot of features you're missing out on, depending on what you're using Photoshop for.

Believe me, there are lots of software packages I would *love* to be able to use (ZBrush, Cinema 4D, etc.) but I've been put off of trying pirated copies for the reasons above. Maybe the youngsters need to be reintroduced to the concept of saving up for stuff.

And maybe Adobe needs to be reintroduced to the concept that removing CHOICE from the customer is a BAD thing!

When you stop to consider the fact that they're still offering CS6 and will continue to support it - plus the fact that other firms like Corel are now offering deals to entice those looking to move from Adobe, not to mention all of the other alternatives that are available - I'd say this is less about choice and more about change. Yes, it sucks that Creative Suite won't be going forward like it used to do, but look at it this way - for some people this might be the impetus they needed to re-examine whether Adobe's workflow is still working for them.

How long do you think they will continue to support CS6? Through the next operating system for Windows and Mac? For people on CC what happens when they stop their subscription? No matter how you slice, it it is BAD for consumers. In a way you are right, it IS about change - HAVING to change over a workflow that has worked for a LONG time. It's about having to change FROM Adobe to something else when you are satisfied with Adobe software. All because Adobe is greedy forcing their customers to "buy" each upgrade now instead of making a good product with reasons TO buy the next upgrade. People think they're going to have the latest and greatest software all the time? Wait until that bubble is burst as Adobe slowly begins to scale back updates and improvements. Remember, they're out to MAKE MONEY, and once you've got your userbase hooked - ie they can' unscubscribe without loosing access to files - they can cut some of their R&D and give people less and less while THEY continue to make more and more. It's what Adobe does - MAKE MONEY. They are not here for customers, they are here for shareholders.

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