A Volcano Dormant for Almost a Century Erupted, Caught From Space by Astronauts Using Nikon D5

A Volcano Dormant for Almost a Century Erupted, Caught From Space by Astronauts Using Nikon D5

NASA has released new images, taken in space, showcasing the huge eruption of the Raikoke volcano in Russia over the weekend. The images were captured by astronauts aboard the International Space Station, and were shot using a Nikon D5.

Situated on Russia’s Kuril Islands, northeast of Japan, the volcano has been dormant for almost 100 years. That is, until last weekend, when the eruption saw smoke, ash, and gas billowing 8 miles (13km) into the air.

The photo was published with no credit to the photographer, who was part the Expedition 59 crew, although NASA did reveal it was shot using a Nikon D5 with a 340mm focal length. The station was orbiting 250 miles (402km) overhead at the time it was taken.

NASA’s statement reads:

On the morning of June 22, astronauts shot a photograph of the volcanic plume rising in a narrow column and then spreading out in a part of the plume known as the umbrella region. That is the area where the density of the plume and the surrounding air equalize and the plume stops rising. The ring of clouds at the base of the column appears to be water vapor.

A whole new meaning to a photographer’s work being out of this world!

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