Can You Guess Which Camera Took Which Picture?

Can You Guess Which Camera Took Which Picture?

Do medium format cameras have a specific look? Do Micro 4/3 camera take horrible still photos? You tell me. 

I happen to have a range of different cameras in my possession and I thought it would be interesting to shoot the same image with each of them to see if we could actually tell a difference. This is not a resolution test, we will do that in another video. This test is strictly to determine if images inherently different coming from different sized sensors and manufacturers. 

I stood in one spot and shot my buddy Keith Bradshaw with 4 different cameras with 4 different sized sensors. To keep the field of view the same, I used a 50mm "equivalent" lens on each camera. To keep the depth of field the same, I changed the aperture as well. My cameras and settings are below. 

FujiFilm GFX 50R/ 43.mm x 32.9mm sensor/ 64mm lens f/8

Canon 6D/ 35mm ff sensor/ 50mm f5.6

FujiFilm XT-3/ 23.6mm x 15.6mm sensor/ 35mm f4

Panasonic GH5/ Micro 4/3 sensor/ 25mm f2.8

I shot each of the images below in raw, I changed only the white balance, and stacked the images on top of each other. I cropped in on all of the images to hide the 4/3 aspect ratio of the GFX and GH5 and shrunk them to 1920 pixels in width. Can you guess which camera took each image? 

UPDATE: The results are in

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124 Comments

Previous comments

Fascinating reading all of the comments but surely at the end of the day any difference is microscopic and would jo public know different cameras were being used. The primary reason any of us take pictures is to satisfy our need for a living or for interest and all 4 of those pictures would look great on the wall.

When do we get to see the actual answers?

Nick Rains's picture

Look, shmook. What's more important is the handling, and performance of things like AF. Getting the shot in the first place trumps any alleged look, which is why MF is not commonly used for sport or street photography, and neither are phones. Neither have the responsiveness of a top notch ILC.
And futhermore, the only really valid comparison tests are using decent sized prints, which no-one seems interested in making these days.

I like the idea of blind comparisons...they help to align a person's frame-of-reference and help them to realize what they need as opposed to what they THINK they need...BUT...

The photos on this web page are being displayed in the LEAST demanding circumstance (on phones or PC monitors, and at low/web/1920 resolution). Indeed, I'd think cell phone camera pics would look about the same under these circumstances. Almost any sensor can look pretty good when the light is good and the dynamic range and color depth of the shot are not very demanding, and, very little cropping is involved.

So this particular blind test is really kinda pointless (unless you are a person who shoots these subjects in these circumstances and displays on phones/PC's).

At least add a test where the light is low and/or the dynamic range high, and/or lots of cropping is involved (the way I happen to frequently shoot...birds under tree cover...surfers in black wetsuits surrounding by glaring/white surf)...and THEN we'd see the larger and more capable sensors rise to the top.