Photojournalistic

Remembering One Of The Masters - Rene Burri (1933 - 2014)

Remembering One Of The Masters - Rene Burri (1933 - 2014)

Chances are you’ve all seen this iconic photo of Che Guevara at some point. But do you know who took it? Magnum, still arguably the most esteemed photographic collective in the world, announced the sad news last week that one of it’s longest serving members, Rene Burri, passed away aged 81. This post celebrates the life and work of Burri, and sheds a little light on what made him such a special photographer.

Photographing the World's Most Dangerous Church

Photographing the World's Most Dangerous Church

Philip Lee Harvey recently went to Ethiopia for Lonely Planet to photograph the world's most inaccessible church... 2,500 feet up and carved into the side of a mountain. The view from the top? Nothing short of spectacular. Amazingly, the Abuna Yemata Guh Church in Tigray, Ethiopia was carved by hand, and the art inside becomes even more incredible when one takes into account that the artist (and anyone who visits) had to make the climb to do it. Talk about devotion.

Medium Format in the Sky: Eric Crosland's Aerial Photos of the Icelandic Eruption

Medium Format in the Sky: Eric Crosland's Aerial Photos of the Icelandic Eruption

Eric Crosland is the director of Sherpa Cinema, a collective of artists who produce some pretty amazing stuff. Crosland recently went to some rather remote parts of Iceland with Dave Mossop and John Trapman working on capturing some landscapes, something for which Iceland is a mecca. While there, the Icelandic eruption occurred and Crosland was ready with a Phase One.

"365 Parisiens" Documents Strangers on the Streets of Paris in Stunning Black and White Portraits

"365 Parisiens" Documents Strangers on the Streets of Paris in Stunning Black and White Portraits

Photographer and art director Constantin Mashinskiy captures stunning black and white portraits of people encountered on the streets of Paris for his ongoing series “365 Parisiens.” Reminiscent of the work of classic street photographers like Cartier-Bresson and Robert Capa, the series is a yearlong project consisting of, at its finish, 365 portraits of strangers in The City of Light.

Censorship is Good for Photography. Seriously.

Censorship is Good for Photography. Seriously.

If there is one medium that has been subject to the most censorship in society for well over a century, it's photography. Further, if there is one medium that has been responsible for the most heated debates about censorship, it's photography. For the most part, photographers decry and loathe censorship, whether it's because they capture nude figures, or create images with fictionalized depictions of violence, or perhaps - arguably the most important - they capture vital, photojournalistic visuals of the world around us which, let's face it, it's sometimes just plain scary. But consider this: Mainstream censorshop is not only necessary in photography, but it helps photography overall. No, really.

Annie Leibovitz' New SUMO Book Spans an Astounding 40-Year Career in 476 Pages

Annie Leibovitz' New SUMO Book Spans an Astounding 40-Year Career in 476 Pages

The most expensive and largest book project of the 20th century was Helmut Newton's SUMO, which sold out at $15,000 per copy, complete with its own book stand (the book is about as big as a medium-sized seven-year-old). Now, Annie Leibovitz' SUMO follows in its footsteps. At 476 pages, the Taschen-published art piece comes enveloped in your choice of four different dust jackets and is limited to 10,000 editioned copies, with the first 1000 coming in a leather-bound hardcover with a signed 20" x 20" archival pigment print and all four dust jackets.

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