Canon Exec Says ‘We Don’t Cripple Our Cameras’

Canon Exec Says ‘We Don’t Cripple Our Cameras’

In a recent interview, one of Canon’s directors has said that the suggestion that Canon cripples its cameras in order to protect other product lines is a conspiracy theory and that doing so would make no commercial sense.

Speaking to CineD, Katsuyuki Nagai, Product Management Director of Image Communication Business at Canon Europe, answered questions about Canon’s recent releases, the EOS R5 and R6, and made it clear that theories that Canon deliberately limits features on its DSLR and MILC cameras in order to protect its cinema cameras have no foundation.

CineD was bold in its questioning, mentioning that Canon has been accused of undermining the trust of its customers as a result of limiting specific features. Nagai was unequivocal: 

This is an accusation we’ve seen before which belongs on the conspiracy theory pile. It is simply not a sensible business idea as users are more likely to switch to competitor systems than buy a much more expensive camera to get a certain feature.

The interview comes just after LensRentals published the results of its teardown of the R5 which concluded that the R5 does not dissipate heat very effectively, probably in part thanks to the level of weather sealing. This ties in with Nagai’s comments that the design of the R5 and R6 is careful to avoid risking “low temperature burns” to users as a result of holding the cameras for extended periods of time.

Are we any closer to knowing what’s happening with heat levels in the R5? Would Canon deliberately crippling its cameras make no commercial sense? Let us know your thoughts in the comments below.

Log in or register to post comments

41 Comments

Previous comments
Malcolm Wright's picture

I believe Canon made a mistake with the entry level EOS200D also known as Rebel SL2 and Kiss X9, when it put the same sensor as the 80D in it and didn't cripple it. If you check out it's scores on DXOmark they're the same.
This error wasn't repeated with the 250D, SL3. Kiss X10, which has a lower score for its sensor..
So does the later camera contain an older sensor or a heavier anti-aliasing filter?
Should buying the latest product result in a step backwards?

Felix C's picture

Canon did cripple the camera one way. The HDMI port only supports 4K. Without 8K support, you cannot send it out to a 8K TV or use a future 8K recorder.

Rhonald Rose's picture

My theory, they do cripple features to some degree (even SaaS providers do, to give enough difference between each subscription packages, intentionally giving you half features in the lower prices packaged and forcing you to upgrade if that's something critical to you).

W.r.t R5, I don't think they intend to give longer recovery time. Over next one year, they will have enough time to test the firmwares and find a better and optimum compromise that provides a true hybrid shooting.

That said, it's not gonna give unlimited 8K recording or 4k HQ recording. But enough to accept it as a hybrid camera and acceptable recording and recovery time.

Tom Anderson's picture

BOTTOM LINE, Canon lied in how they marketed the camera, they lied about it again in this interview as well. On top of that, they accuse those who have PROVEN they are lying of being conspiracy theorists.

Paul 2's picture

It will be interesting to see when Sony releases the A7IV and if they implement a 4k 60fps mode with no overheating and recording time. I think many Canon hybrid users may migrate over. I am a Canon user but i feel as if Sony listens and have more 'trust' with thier consumers.

Deleted Account's picture

Black Magic make a 12k camera.

Tammie Lam's picture

Same price as the R5 I guess?

David Pavlich's picture

It's about $10,000. I didn't check on lens prices.

toni 2's picture

Canon sells crippled cameras (a lot of models). Canon sells cameras with confusing video specifications (R5). The worst is than Canon sells what they want, not what users want (selling DSLR and waiting a lot of years to sell mirrorless).
A lot of Nikon and Canon users have gone to Sony. Right now I understand them, I think, for the first time, that I will do the same. I'm bored to wait what Canon wants to do. It's time to do what I want to do. Canon has been selling promises a lot of years. I want reality, perhaps not perfect reality, but not promises.