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Ruby Love
Olympia, WA

Articles written by Ruby Love

Surreal Cityskapes: Bence Bakonyi's 'Urbanite' Series

In a surreal blend of day and night, Budapest-based photographer Bence Bakonyi’s series “Urbanite” features vast cityscapes seemingly devoid of people. Shot in Hong Kong and Shanghai, the series presents settings in which the presence of humanity is eerily close, as though the population had suddenly fled, leaving lights on and laundry on the line.

Vivid Photographs Showcase Beauty of Vatnajökull, Iceland's Largest Glacier

London-based photographer Kate Friend’s new series, shot in Iceland, features stunningly colorful photographs of the largest remaining glacier in the country. The glacier, called Vatnajökull, measures around 8,000 square kilometers of solid ice. Taken both in and outside the glacier, Friend’s photographs showcase its vastness and dramatic hues.

"This is Boy": Solitude, Wildness and Beauty in the Life of a Young Boy

Effingham, Illinois-based photographer Tytia Habing’s ongoing series “This is Boy” beautifully captures the dichotomy of peace and wild energy inherent in its subject-her young son. The series, presented exclusively in black and white, features Habing’s son over a period of several years. Usually with her son as the sole subject, the series displays a remarkable range of emotion as he shifts from contemplative, to vivacious, to vulnerable.

Intriguing "Sand Creatures" Series Features Bursts of Sand Frozen in Mid-Air

Photographer Claire Droppert’s series “Sand Creatures” features photographs of sand clouds in mid-air as they form eye-catching, animal-like figures. Often titled after the animals they resemble (some more closely than others), the bursts of sand take on beautiful, energetic presences.

"Duluth Typologies": Series Alters Perception with Angle

While Minneapolis-based photographer Cameron Wittig is probably best known for his intriguing portraits of musicians like Haley Bonar and Andrew Bird, I discovered him through his humorous project, “Duluth Typologies”. The series features houses built on steep hills in the small town of Duluth, Minnesota. Using a simple adjustment of angle, the houses in “Duluth Typologies” appear to be sliding into the flat ground beneath them, creating a humorous commentary on the potential of imagery to lie.

Fascinating Colorizations Bring New Life to Historical Photographs

Ryan Urban, a young EMT and nursing student from Colorado, has been crafting incredible colorizations of historical black and white photographs. With the addition of color, the images are suddenly full of life, giving the viewer a glimpse at what the scenes depicted in these photographs would have looked like at the time.

Artist Photographs Intricate Landscapes Created in a 200-Gallon Fish Tank

Multimedia artist Kim Keever’s “Landscape” series features settings of post-apocalyptic beauty. The photographs portray scenes like cloud-laced mountain ranges, giant seaside cliffs or fiery sunsets. Although the images are incredible enough on their own, the process Keever uses to create them is even more intriguing.

High Desert: Polaroids by Nate Matos

“It began with a cheeseburger. As we drove 5 hours to relive a childhood memory at a diner in Bend, OR the appeal of the area around us was clear. Vast sweeping landscapes being capped at either end with snowy peaks surrounded us, but where we were, and what we saw was dry. The arid homes, leafless trees and bright blue sky is what we would remember.”

Humorous Photo Series Documents Modern Vices

Many of us are trying to give up a vice this month; some of us more successfully than others (I broke my no-caffeine pledge about 36 hours in). With modern vices on the minds of many, it seemed like the perfect time to post a charming new series by photographer Jamie Johnson, simply titled “Vices”.

Photo Series Gives Insight into the Everyday Lives of the Ku Klux Klan

Photojournalist, humanitarian and former marine Anthony Karen spent a decade documenting the lives of Ku Klux Klan members, gaining unprecedented access to a rarely-seen world. Karen’s interest in documenting this society required months of reaching out to Klan members before he was eventually allowed access to an event. First in rural Tennessee, Karen’s work eventually brought him to document groups across the United States. His resulting series, Ku Klux Klan, is fascinating and surprisingly intimate.

Michael Christopher Brown on Living and Working in the DRC

The Democratic Republic of Congo, often referred to simply as “DRC”, is a country steeped in reports of extreme violence, corruption and unrest. Citing ethnic conflict and the pursuit of control over abundant mineral resources, The New York Times referred to the country as “one of the biggest battlefields in Africa’s history.”

"Delicadezas" Whimsical Portraits by Guilherme Brasileiro

When I first came across Guilherme Brasileiro’s series “Delicadezas” on Instagram, I was pulled in by a seemingly nonsensical, quirky theme: dozens of portraits, cropped close featuring men and women, each holding a hand under their chin. The energy of the series struck me as open and full of warmth; the subject’s reaction to the pose they had been asked to assume was usually very apparent (some looked amused, a good few looked self-conscious, and some had really obviously embraced the idea).

Winter in Vancouver: Photographs by Scott Rankin

Scott Rankin’s calmly stunning photographs initially caught my eye on Instagram, and I reached out to him to talk a little about his process. Like so many others in the digital age, Rankin’s interest in photography was sparked after joining Instagram, where the ease of shooting prompted the couple to start spending weekends going on photo walks. Drawn to landscapes involving human elements like silhouettes or a lone figure, Rankin says, “I love the idea of small people surrounded by big nature.”