Gitzo GT5563GS Giant, the Tall Tripod That (Almost) Reaches Into the Sky

Is your tripod not giving you access to the heights you need? Check out this Gitzo GT5563GS Giant review.

Finding a reliable tripod that fits our needs is kind of like searching for the right camera. Although there are many different options on the market, knowing what you will be using your piece of kit for will help you determine the key things you are looking for. That's why Usman and I were thrilled to review Gitzo GT5563GS Giant tripod, because it is a highly specialized piece of equipment that will be interesting to a particular type of photographer.

This tripod is made out of high-capacity carbon fiber to reduce the weight you would need to carry while still remaining stable. Where this tripod shines is in its height, though. Starting out with a minimum height of 3.9", it can extend all the way up to impressive 109.4", which is a height most of us have never tried to work at. The unique features and durability of this tripod are reflected in its higher price, $1,549.88. However, if this is something that will benefit your photography career, it could be a piece of equipment that will be with you for decades.

In this video review, we are testing out this giant Gitzo tripod during a windy day shooting architecture in a city and reviewing the different fields of vision one can achieve by starting at an eye level and extending the tripod legs to reach up high to obtain a different view. As some pointed out in comments already, an impressive tripod like this can be very useful for different and challenging outdoor environments, where stability and height are key in achieving those important shots. 

Could you see yourself shooting with this tripod at its maximum height?

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22 Comments

Mark Forman's picture

I have had my Gitzo Giant for many years. It has been very useful for 2 things. Shooting on stairs and on sharply sloped locations.
It also is my go to tripod for use with the Gitzo100mm bowl adapter and my Cartoni 100mm Gamma medium weight video fluid head with loads of about 10KG (25lbs.) It also gets used with most long lenses and my Wimberly gimbal.head Solid in every use and wind resistant when doing critical shots.

jim hughes's picture

There has to be a punch line for that photo... but I can't think of one.

Anete Lusina's picture

I wanted to send a witty comment response back but also couldn't think of one :-)

jim hughes's picture

A good cat burglar used to be called a "second story man". Hmmm.

Alexander Petrenko's picture

Solution for those on a budget: screw a reasonably high monopod to a reasonably high tripod.

Dan E's picture

When I use to photograph cars in the studio, I would use it for a kind of aerial view of certain details or to look down into convertibles. It actually worked really nice for that. Especially because it was so sturdy. I was able to safely able to spread the legs over a very expensive vintage exotic car toward the back. Or similar shot from the front looking down on engine, and felt completely comfortable doing so. I have an older model which I may like better because it is not carbon fiber and is heavy. Very stable. I guess if I had some sort of crane, I could have easily accomplished the same thing. But would have been much more setup and way more expensive.

Anete Lusina's picture

Did you control the camera through wireless or wired tethering? After using this big tripod, it was a thing that came up - how does one efficiently alter the angle / view of the camera once it's all the way up there. (Admittedly, we did not have a stepladder with us to help with that!).

Dan E's picture

CamRanger was my best friend.

Viewfinder Journey's picture

Extends up to 108" and the title states " up to the sky( almost). ????

g coll's picture

Really? Your interpretation of the title was actually literally "to the sky"? Wow.

Anete Lusina's picture

That's why I put in the "almost" ;)

Chris Rogers's picture

Iffin Goliath was a photographer this would be his tripod.

Miha Me's picture

.

Chris Rogers's picture

lmao Tom Cruise could probably hang a hammock off this thing and chill

Richard Tack's picture

This "review" was misguided. The Giant is for specific applications that the reviewer had little or no experience with. Real estate and architectural photographers love height for their exterior shots and besides tall tripods like the Giant, they resort to getting high resolution shots using painter's poles, tall ladders, all the way to hydraulically operated bucket trucks. The "architectural" shots the reviewer demonstrated with this tripod did not come close to showing its capability or the correct usage of height. You don't send a street photographer out to review a 4x5 Graflex.

Alexander Petrenko's picture

Do you have examples of correct usage of this tripod?

Alexander Petrenko's picture

Do you have something more specific for this tripod? I see many photos made with other tools.

Richard Tack's picture

You place a camera at a desired height via a hill, an adjacent house/building, a drone, a ladder, a pole, a bucket truck, a car/truck roof OR a Gitzo Giant tripod; the results are exactly the same.

Alexander Petrenko's picture

So, nothing wrong with putting a monopod on a tripod?

Tim Foster's picture

I bought one because I got a good deal on it used and it doesn't take up much more space than the short ones. I've used it for stills and video for six or seven years now. 100mm bowl, 75mm bowl, flat plate, center column. From hi-hat level to 9 feet. It really will do everything.

Dan E's picture

I also got a good deal on a older used one. Folds up fairly small relatively speaking. Mine has a center column that goes up another 2.5 feet. With camera I’m at about 12’