Hands-On First Impression of the Leica M10-R with Sample Images

The new Leica M series camera was today announced and it is offering some impressive gains over its predecessors.

Leica's M Series cameras have proven popular and they have now upgraded the M10 once more by nearly doubling the resolution. The  Leica M10-R now has a 40.9 megapixel, full frame CMOS sensor which is quite the upgrade from the 24 megapixel sensor of even the M10-P. The only M Series body to already sport this much resolution is the M10 Monochrom, which as you might be able to extract from the name, only shoots black and white! However, apart from the sensor, this is exactly the same camera as the M10-P in every other way; body, materials, processor, and so on.

With the sharp rise in resolution, there will naturally be questions of whether the glass can support it (I have no doubts it can) and whether the dynamic range and color performance is on par with older M10 models. Leica claim that not only is it equal to, but it's greater than the previous M Series cameras in both these areas, though by how much is unclear.

What do you think of the new Leica M10-R? Is it on your shopping list?

Log in or register to post comments

36 Comments

Pieter Batenburg's picture

This camera costs 6000€ in Europe (without lens). I just wonder how many people will buy this camera.

Leopold Bloom's picture

Definitely on my "not buy" list. I don't need a camera that costs 6000 €, even if I could afford it.
It doesn't make me a better photographer, if I buy more expensive gear and I don't need a status symbol dangling around my neck to show off.

Sascha Bartel's picture

you don't understand the leica thing ;)

Deleted Account's picture

Leopold may or may not understand; however, I understand perfectly.

Leica is the epitome of luxury branding.
Those who use Leica absolutely experience cognitive dissonance; which is why they talk in term of intangibles.

Side note: you created an account for the sole purpose of maing this comment.

Alex Nordheim's picture

Maybe you could explain a bit more, how usage of Leica cams is linked to cognitive dissonance? I am a Leica user and prefer not to get recognized as such, when doing Street photography. This contradicts your absolute message, that Leica is the epitome of luxury branding, implying implicitely that those who use it regard a Leica as an item to decorate themselves rather than using a cam for taking pics. I created my account to reply to your ignorant and prejudice-loaded message, usually I just read messages.

Deleted Account's picture

Well, if YOU are a Leica user...

One assumes you are not aware of the meaning of cognitive dissonance. I cannot help but reflect you have not provided a rebuttal by means of a tangible.

Given your fundamental lack of comprehension, you require education around core concepts - otherwise you are simply not equiped to engage in a meaningful conversation.

The idea of a luxury brand is not necessarily a product or a price point, but a mindset where core values that are expressed by a brand are directly connected to the producer's dedication and alignment to perceptions of quality with its customers' values and aspirations.[21] Thus, it is these target customers, not the product, that make a luxury brand.[21] Brands that are considered luxury connect with their customers by communicating that they are the top of their class or considered the best in their field.[22] Furthermore, these brands must deliver - in some meaningful way - measurably better performance.[22] What consumers perceive as luxurious brands and products change over the years, but there appear to be three main drivers: (1) a high price, especially when compared to other brands within its segment; (2) limited supply, in that a brand may not need to be expensive, but it arguably should not be easily obtainable and contributing to the customers' feeling that they have something special; and (3) endorsement by celebrities, which can make a brand or particular products more appealing for consumers and thus more "luxurious" in their minds.[23] Two additional elements of luxury brands include special packaging and personalization.[23] These differentiating elements distance the brands from the mass market and thus provide them with a unique feeling and user experience as well as a special and memorable "luxury feel" for customers.[23] However, the concept of a luxury brand is now so popular that it is used in almost every retail, manufacturing, and service sector.[24] Moreover, new marketing concepts such as "mass-luxury" or "hyper luxury" further blur the definition of what is a luxury product, a luxury brand, or a luxury company.[24]

Examples include LVMH (Louis Vuitton Moet Hennessy), the largest luxury good producer in the world with over fifty brands, including Louis Vuitton, the brand with the world's first fashion designer label.[25] The LVMH group made a net profit of €8.1 billion on sales of €42.6 billion in 2017. [26] Other market leaders[citation needed] include Richemont and Kering (previously named PPR).

A rather small group in comparison, the wealthy tend to be extremely influential.[citation needed] Once a brand gets an "endorsement" from members of this group, then the brand can be defined as a true "luxury" brand. An example of different product lines in the same brand is found in the automotive industry, with "entry-level" cars marketed to younger, less wealthy consumers, and higher-cost models for older and more wealthy consumers.[citation needed]

The advertising expenditure for the average luxury brand is 5-15% of sales revenue, or about 25% with the inclusion of other communications such as public relations, events and sponsorships.[27]

In the field of psychology, cognitive dissonance occurs when a person holds two or more contradictory beliefs, ideas, or values; or participates in an action that goes against one of these three, and experiences psychological stress because of that. According to this theory, when two actions or ideas are not psychologically consistent with each other, people do all in their power to change them until they become consistent.[1] The discomfort is triggered by the person's belief clashing with new information perceived, wherein they try to find a way to resolve the contradiction to reduce their discomfort.[1][2]

In A Theory of Cognitive Dissonance (1957), Leon Festinger proposed that human beings strive for internal psychological consistency to function mentally in the real world. A person who experiences internal inconsistency tends to become psychologically uncomfortable and is motivated to reduce the cognitive dissonance. They tend to make changes to justify the stressful behavior, either by adding new parts to the cognition causing the psychological dissonance or by avoiding circumstances and contradictory information likely to increase the magnitude of the cognitive dissonance.[2]

Coping with the nuances of contradictory ideas or experiences is mentally stressful. It requires energy and effort to sit with those seemingly opposite things that all seem true. Festinger argued that some people would inevitably resolve dissonance by blindly believing whatever they wanted to believe.

Deleted Account's picture

Wait, it was clear he didn't comprehend either luxury branding or cognitive dissonance; do morons like you expect I would write an essay? Which I have not pretended to do nor have I pretended the presented material is anything but a cut and paste.

Also, what you are attempting to describe is not an artifact of cognitive dissonance.
You people are so incredibly stupid.

I cannot help but observe all three of you are new accounts.

Deleted Account's picture

Epic. You think they are complex words.

Given you created a profile exclusively to troll, it's not my psychological state which is in question.

You know what I wrote doesn't have the structure of an essay, right?

Not only are you stupid, you aren't that interesting.

Deleted Account's picture

No, you idiot, an essay has a structure.

Anyway, this is where I strip your oxygen. You really aren't that interesting and I have about 600 frames to sort.

Bye Felicia.

Deleted Account's picture

Such a shame you'll never know.

Is this really the best you have? Really?

Deleted Account's picture

Nope. There is a difference between superiority complex and having a low opinion of idiots on the internet; as a consequemce of comstant exposure - such as yourself.

I give a D for effort.

Deleted Account's picture

"I'd give your mom the D"

At least your flailing attempt to get under my skin made me laugh.

Deleted Account's picture

Interestingly enough, you gave me insight - not that you remotely demonstrated insight; however, you made me think about sensitisation, as it pertains to the Internet.

Thanks.

Alex Nordheim's picture

Walter, first, I did not know how to react to your reply, as the number of questions I have even increased. Well, hoping to get finally equipped to engage in a meaningful conversation (as you said, I did not copy the spelling mistake of equiped in your post), may I ask you, in a humble way, step by step:

1 - Original question of my first post: "Maybe you could explain a bit more, how usage of Leica cams is linked to cognitive dissonance?", where did you reply to this question? Please help me, a simple definition of what is cognitive dissonance is no response to my question.

2 - Coming back to the primary target of our little conversation: You imply with your message "Those who use Leica absolutely experience cognitive dissonance", so me, being a Leica user, I experience cognitive dissonance. Could you explain, why and in what situations I feel cognitive dissonance? Your answer may sort my life, even if I am not aware of any psychological inconsistencies on my side.

3 - You write, "Given your fundamental lack of comprehension, you require education around core concepts". What makes you confident that this is the case?

4 - Let's proceed with later messages from you with reference to my person: you write, that "it was clear he didn't comprehend either luxury branding or cognitive dissonance", from where do you take this insight?

5 - On your assumption that I need education regarding the term luxury: "In spite of considerable prior research on luxury branding, no widely accepted definition of “luxury brand” exists" (E. Ko, J. P. Costello, C. R. Taylor: "What is luxury brand? A new definition and review of literature" in Journal of Business Research, Vol 99, pp. 405-413) - happy to learn from you, what makes Leica a luxury brand (again, please do not copy definitions without any reference to my question)

6 - Why do you become personal in your post ("Given your fundamental lack of comprehension") while my post was, I admit, a bit provocative but did not insult you personally (you, as a recognized knowledgeable man will understand the difference between insulting someone personally through what you wrote versus judging a statement or post as " ignorant and prejudice-loaded"

Really looking forward to receive replies to my burning questions. And next time, if you copy/ paste, please use proper sources and cite those accordingly. When I did my PhD, copying without citing as well as using inappropriate sources to backup a logic chain were reasons to get abandoned from the academic family, well, times may have changed, if you are an academic and this is appropriate now.

Deleted Account's picture

Oh FFS.

1. This is not an academic setting.

2. The referencing system in Wiki makes Wiki immediately recognisable - as empirically demonstrated by both yourself and the moron who tried to troll me.

3. A factual statement is not necessarily an insult. For example, calling an obese man obese.

4. You still haven't demonstrated any sort of rebuttal of my thesis by reference to a tangible. You are still nothing more than a person strongly responding on purely emotional grounds - you know, consistent with cognitive dissonance, after voluntary buy in. Also, you conflated luxury branding with regognition of status by others.

How indeed.

5. You assert you have a PhD; cool. Go do the research yourself and draw whatever inferences you wish.

I have had enough Internet for today. You can thank the obvious troll for that.

Alex Nordheim's picture

Walter, and still you did not reply to my original question... it‘s like having independent monologues which, by coincidence, occur in one discussion stream. It‘s like playing chess with a dove. There will be the moment, when the dove flies on the chess board, skips all figures, shits on the chessboard and, after that, will walk up and down with an attitude of having gained a victory.

Deleted Account's picture

No, this is not a debate, and I've still had enough for the day.

Accept it or not, discount it or not, research it or not. I don't care, what you believe is of zero importance to my existence - as are the beliefs of any random person on the Internet (that troll served a purpose for me).

Cool, you think I'm stupid. Good chat.

Alex Nordheim's picture

Walter, with all respect, assuming "fundamental lack of comprehension“ on my side which „require(s) education around core concepts" and, being asked where you take this insight from, replying „A factual statement is not necessarily an insult“ disappoints, you have to admit that.

Deleted Account's picture

Yes, I have to...

Clearly I'm an idiot, who is not as smart as you. You win.

All you are doing at this point is convincing me you have been educated beyond your intellect.

Also, some quite unique markers in your writing...

Deleted Account's picture

As an aside, it is astonishing to me that I would have to connect the dots for someone who has a PhD.

Alex Nordheim's picture

this, together with the fact, that I have asked questions in order to better understand your way of thinking without receiving accurate replies, allows for at least two interpretations - either, you are not precise enough in your communication, or your thoughts are not logic.

Deleted Account's picture

Yeah, inference just isn't your thing, nor is self-reflection, apparently.

Deleted Account's picture

The zingers keep coming.

But again, you're the one creating accounts for the sole purpose of trolling.

How's that self-esteem?

Deleted Account's picture

Yes, because [citation needed] isn't immediately recognisable.

And no, not all academic works use footnoting, and not all footnoting is the same. I suppose you've never heard of APA, Harvard, or Chicago.

Deleted Account's picture

Not even remotely close to most. The vast majority are in line.

You seem upset.

Alex Nordheim's picture

Well, Walter, maybe we do not find a common ground, as our context is completely different to mine. You say, Leica owners only talk in intangibles about Leica (at least, this is my interpretation of your statement). I do not talk about my Leicas, I use them. If I describe them, which I do now for the first time, in order to articulate, why I really like them:

- I like the clear and focused functionality, no auto functions, pure manual work, it‘s me who produces the pic - photography at its purest. There is no other brand with a comparably consequent product

- the precision of the manufacturing process is outstanding, tolerances significantly lower than with all other brands I know

- the rendering of the lenses is unique, I haven‘t seen this with other brands

- the 3rd market for optics is hughe, as you can use lenses produced in the 1930s on an M

- Most important: my cams are small and handy, which I did not find with any other brand.

Those are tangible aspects which make me prefer Leica. I still do not know, why I may suffer from cognitive dissonance...

Kenneth Tanaka's picture

Personally, I’m happy with my M10-P which I’ve now has for nearly two years. It’s about as perfect of a digital rangefinder camera as I could want and I don’t feel the need for larger files from it. (I.e. I’ve no plans whatsoever to trade it in!)

John Ricard's picture

This camera costs a lot of money. I can get a different camera for less money. I don’t understand why expensive products exists. All products should be cheap.

Alex Yakimov's picture

Dats rrright, mate!

More comments