New SD Express Memory Cards Enable 128 TB Storage and 985 MB/s Speed

A new announcement from the SD Association reveals the maximum capacity SD cards can store is to jump from 2 TB to a whopping 128 TB thanks to a new SD Express standard. Select cards will also run with a maximum transfer speed rate of 985 MB/s.

The new SD Ultra Capacity (SDUC) card will be able to store 64 times what its predecessor was able to. SD Express has increased the maximum data transfer rate from 624 MB/s for UHS-III to 985 MB/s after adding the PCI Express and NVMe interfaces.

The move could be inspired by competition from mobile phone photography, with the need for faster data processing required in order to keep up with mobile computing. Hiroyuki Sakamoto, president of the SDA, compared the cards to being like a “removable SSD.” SD Express will first be offered in SDUC, SDXC and SDHC memory cards.

Mats Larsson, Senior Market Analyst at Futuresource, said:

SD Express’ use of popular PCIe and NVMe interfaces to deliver faster transfer speeds is a savvy choice since both protocols are widely used in the industry today and creates a compelling choice for devices of all types. The SD Association has a robust ecosystem with a strong history of integrating SD innovations and has earned the trust of consumers around the world.

Representing a significant increase in speed and capacity capabilities, the new cards will make a huge difference not only for photographers who deal with ultra-high res imagery, but also for videographers shooting 8K footage.

The release date of SDUC Express cards has yet to be announced.

Lead image from Pixabay.

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11 Comments

Fritz Asuro's picture

UHS-II cards cost more than XQD, imagine the price of SDExpress?

Also, this is a sign that XQD/CFExpress will die sooner as the SD format is widely used vs XQD or CF

Spy Black's picture

Once it's mainstream the prices will go down. All the XQD lemmings will be sweating bullets from here on in. :-)

Some people depend on XQD for their cameras. Why is the possible demise of the format something to smile about?

Spy Black's picture

...because it was a proprietary format that was shoved down people's throats. It's been a stillborn, overpriced medium. It should have never happened. I'll be happy to see it die.

So, no empathy for the people with those cameras. Okay.

Fritz Asuro's picture

The thing is XQD is really great in performance, build quality, and form factor. It could have really been the best storage media for cameras and other devices!
So far, only BluRay is the only Sony implemented solution that has been "accepted" by many.

I am one of the few who still awaits XQD/CFExpress's brighter future.

Gil N's picture

I remember the Blu-Ray vs HD-DVD days. Blu-Ray wasn't accepted in a day! The users would benefit from a single memory card format, but we all know how it goes.

Rashad Hurani's picture

I dont trust these huge figures in the transfer rate department. 1GB/s rate means 8Gb/s putting the frequency of the signal passing through contacts in the 10 GHz (1 cm wavelength) range, making any piece of metal carrying this signal a microwave transmitting antenna

Chris PLUNKETT's picture

Quite possibly,but it might have a range of as much as a couple of millimetres!

Steve Harwood's picture

After watching the video, I'm not sure I understand: Do these cards use PCIe and NVMe interfaces??? [grin]

The thing is XQD is really great in performance, build quality, and form factor. It could have really been the best storage media for cameras and other devices!
So far, only BluRay is the only Sony implemented solution that has been "accepted" by many.