Duchess of Cambridge Photographs Holocaust Survivors for 75th Anniversary of Auschwitz Liberation

Duchess of Cambridge Photographs Holocaust Survivors for 75th Anniversary of Auschwitz Liberation

Catherine (Kate) Middleton, Duchess of Cambridge, has created a series of images to mark the 75th anniversary of the end of the Holocaust.

The Holocaust — an event from which humanity is some way off of recovering from, if indeed it's at all possible — sits in a difficult period of history; not only for the atrocities seen but its mixture of recency and distance. For those in schools today, it must seem so far back it's difficult to relate to. But many of us had parents, grandparents, and other family members who were directly affected by the Holocaust and to whom it is important to remember the events.

Kate Middleton, Duchess of Cambridge, is a keen member of The Royal Photographic Society and keen photographer. This week she published a series for the anniversary of the end of the Holocaust in which she photographed survivors.

To stay within Fstoppers' wheelhouse, I'll discuss the images which I think are beautiful. They have a classic, painterly portrait feel achieved with what looks to be one large softbox, mimicking a bay window typically used to light paintings of subjects throughout the ages. The simple, reserved style is fitting and the images are sweet and reflective. I'm not one to heap praise on "celebrity" photographers simply because their fame predates their relationship with a camera, but there's very little to not enjoy about this artistic memorial.

Lead image by Ricky Wilson used under Creative Commons 2.0

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12 Comments
Studio 403's picture

So touching, thank you for keeping the memories alive in photography. Inspires me to keep shooting.

Alex Herbert's picture

I don't think Kate has an account on this site. You'd do better to send her a letter :)

David Pavlich's picture

Anything to keep what happened during WWII in the world's memory is a good thing!

Motti Bembaron's picture

Agree.

David Pavlich's picture

My uncle was with Patton's Third Army and saw it. The only way I knew about it was my Dad, his brother, told me. My uncle wouldn't talk about it. :-(

Rhonald Rose's picture

Yep, true. It's being systematically wiped out of school history books which isn't good

David Pavlich's picture

Surprisingly, I was in a junior high library where our photo club holds its meetings. Looking through their books, I found a very good book about the European Theater that was not only full of facts, but loaded with images. I do know, though, that it's not taught like it was when I was in school....1969 high school grad.

William Nicholson's picture

And it's sad that history is not taught the way it was and today they teach and discuss soft issues of history so children do not get feelings hurt. I have two boys that will soon graduate high school know very little about the war to end all wars and the holocaust. It is frowned upon to teach such history because the so called children experts claim such teaching will traumatize children. WTF is wrong with our society. I have discussed the holocaust in length with them. It seems to many parents and special groups want to shelter our youth from the truth of war's.

Motti Bembaron's picture

Well done!

jim hughes's picture

Nice work.

Blake Aghili's picture

I came here to see what camera she used :D

Kyle Thomson's picture

"They have a classic, painterly portrait feel achieved with what looks to be one large softbox, mimicking a bay window typically used to light paintings of subjects throughout the ages."

What? looks like they used an actual window, its in the second photo of the first instagram post...