34
Votes
Tim Sullivan's picture

Bay Bridge Serenade

We decided to lug a cello around the financial district of San Francisco for a fun day of shooting. This shot was an interesting example of how getting down low can get rid of all the people that are right on the other side of the grass. I also wanted to bring the Bay Bridge in close in the frame, so I used a long-ish lens, which put me out in the street holding up traffic. Good times, and I think it was totally worth it. It's one of the things that makes me feel like photography is magic. It's finding something interesting in the seemingly uninteresting. This was shot with a Nikon D810 and a 70-200mm f/2.8 lens at 1/100 sec @ f/4.5 ISO 64.

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3 Comments
Marc F's picture

Fake. The bow must be held by the right hand, and the strings by the left. Unfortunately in our days, people addicted to rock, pop and other garbage music only know to scratch electric guitar, to beat on keyboards, and those that call themselves “singers” but never took any singing lessons only yell or scream into microphones. But the lighting of the picture is good.

Sebastian Schmid's picture

Just checked your portfolio and I need to say that you do know how to shoot environmental portraits, you know light, you know pose. Great stuff! But, please, don‘t use instruments as props. It hurts. I am sure many musicians would be interested in having their portrait done by you. Just make sure nobody gets to see this one.

Colin Bamford's picture

So this really annoys me. Two comments from two people that have no evidence of their own work. For Marc F to say fake I think you should retract that statement. To say that it suggests that there is a fake background or something. At no time did Tim say it was a real cello player. The exercise of the image is very much lost in you. That aside Looking at the image I think it's a very good image.
Nice lighting on the model and foreground with a fantastic DoF. Nice overall tone to the image.
As was once said,

No man has the right to dictate what other men should perceive, create or produce, but all should be encouraged to reveal themselves, their perceptions and emotions, and to build confidence in the creative spirit.
Ansel Adams.