The Most Iconic Photos from the 2018 FIFA World Cup

The Most Iconic Photos from the 2018 FIFA World Cup

In case you missed it, don't worry, we have compiled some of the best moments of the 2018 FIFA World Cup. Since its kickoff on June 14, this has been one of the more memorable World Cups in recent history. There have been so many iconic moments, drama-filled events, and even social barriers overcome. Compiling all these moments into one article can't do it justice.

The Sights

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The Scenes

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The Beautiful Game

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The Heroes

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The Underdogs

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The Fanfare

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History Made

Probably the most overlooked story of the 2018 FIFA World Cup resided in Iran. For almost 40 years, the de facto ban which was instituted after the 1979 Islamic Revolution had prevented Iranian women from attending sporting events. Any women who challenged this law risked imprisonment. But the longstanding policy softened for this year's World Cup. Thousands of women poured into Azadi Stadium in Tehran to watch live broadcasts of the Iranian National Team play in the group stages.

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The Triumph

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The Heartbreak

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The Respect

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It's Coming Home

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The Finale

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The Champions

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Lead image used with permission from Rodrigo Villalba

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18 Comments

Christos Dikos's picture

Great photos but where are the scantily clad women? ;)

I thought about saying something like that but chickened out. :-)

Patrick Hall's picture

Ironically, the most iconic photos failed to accurately portray one of the most talked about social justice issues of the world cup...

I suppose they could have found some photos of leering men drinking beer, sitting on the couch, scanning the TV coverage for a glimpse of a scantily clad woman. Probably not very compelling though.

I don't understand your point. Are you saying there doesn't seem to be a problem of photographing too many attractive women or they should have highlighted the issue? Either way, who decided they were "the most iconic photos"?
As an aside, in my limited experience and regarding most subjects, "the most talked about social justice issues" are talked about by a small handful of very loud people who remind me of a certain boy in one of Aesop's fables.

Nick Pecori's picture

I love the game of soccer (football), so I chose to spend my time searching for the best moments of this great tournament as well as a positive, overlooked story in Iran. I really enjoyed compiling these photos together that the photographers captured.

There are two other articles covering the attractive women issue, where I believe that discussion would be best continued in those articles respectively.

:-p
;-)

Seems like on every single shot... Often in bokeh, sometimes out if frame.

PS: Why female photographers are underrepresented on Getty? That’s what bothers me.

Patrick Hall's picture

My guess would be there are simply less sports photographers who are women. That's not necessarily a bad thing considering sports lenses are the heaviest piece of camera gear you could carry around. I wouldn't want to do that job if I could do any job in the photography world.

The real question you might be asking is "does the ratio of male photos taken represent the same ratio of men to women photographers at the event?" If it does, then there are simply less female photographers. If it doesn't, then you have to ask if 1) does Getty have a bias towards male photographers or 2) could male photographers just be taking better iconic photos than women?

I've been on the sidelines of one national championship game (NCAA football, there is an Fstoppers video on our youtube channel) and of course I look at photographers during live broadcasts, and it's easy to see that there are WAY more male photographers with massive 300mm+ 2.8/4 lenses than women. Maybe the area of interest should move from Getty publishing more images from men to why are there more men on the field to begin with?

Gil N's picture

For watching this moment live and editing a lot of dark skinned people, I'm pretty sure Sadio Mané arm in the cover picture of the article isn't this charcoal black. I understand the need for emphasis but come on.

I doubt that was intentional.

I was surprised not to see this photo of President Macron celebrating https://www.rt.com/sport/433274-macron-world-cup-celebrations-moscow/

I'm guessing it's because it's by Sputnik and not Getty Images

Some great shots but, as is the case with such a large gallery, some really dull shots too.

Nick Pecori's picture

Some add context to the others.

Leigh Smith's picture

Most of these are pretty forgettable. Let alone being classified as iconic.

david kidd's picture

"Best of Gettyimages Photos from the 2018 FIFA World Cup" is the relevant title, IMO.