Gear

DJI's MōVI Competitor, the Ronin, Gets a $1500 Price Slash Ahead of Release

DJI's MōVI Competitor, the Ronin, Gets a $1500 Price Slash Ahead of Release

When the MōVI came to market, it changed the video world instantly. It was, quite simply, an unimaginably amazing stabilization rig that looked to defy physics. We all wanted one, but at the asking price of $5000, many thought it was a bit too steep to rationalize. That's why the DJI competitor, the Ronin, had so many excited. Now there is even more to look forward to, as it's set to retail for only $1500 less than originally announced.

Review in Progress: The Sony a7S and the Promise of 4K

Review in Progress: The Sony a7S and the Promise of 4K

The Sony a7S has been the subject of a hotbed of conversation for the past four or five months as a camera with a lot of potential to really shake up the cinema world. This of course was extremely interesting to me as a videographer. I've finally gotten my hands on the camera and after a few days shooting with it on set, I'm not quite ready to write a review, but I do think it is important to address a feature about which I feel lied to: 4K.

Beyond The Key - Building A Subtle Light Setup

Beyond The Key - Building A Subtle Light Setup

Lighting isn't easy, a world-class-perfectly-lit studio portrait happens with a lot of instinct and experience. A strong grasp of lighting comes with experimentation and practice. Those that know my aesthetic know I'm a huge fan of one light photography. With that said, every image I produce I try and maintain the look of one light, even though it very well be lit with six lights. If I'm shooting for a hair, the hair needs to be well lit. If I'm shooting for makeup, the light needs to fill the face and really show detail. The same applies to product photography or fashion. I always give the client what they need, but always retain my dramatic lighting style.

BTS: How This Beautiful Slow-Mo Film of a House Set on Fire Was Made

BTS: How This Beautiful Slow-Mo Film of a House Set on Fire Was Made

Slow motion is, certainly, one of the most beautiful cinematic inventions of all time. It can show us so many things that are not normally visible and can make any "normal" scene look magical and unique. For the past few years the slow motion technologies have continued to improve, and just last year the Phantom Flex4K Digital Cinema Camera was announced introducing some groundbreaking slow motion abilities like shooting at 1,000fps at at 4K resolution. Shortly after its release, Director Brendan Bellomo and cinematographer Greg Wilson got their hands on the camera and took it for a test and created this beautiful video called "Let Me Know When You See Fire."

Eight Tips I Wish Someone Told Me Early in My Career

Eight Tips I Wish Someone Told Me Early in My Career

Regret is the worst feeling in the world but as humans, we feel it. There are times we all look back at, kicking ourselves thinking "if only I had known… I would've done it differently." I remember telling myself if I was ever given the opportunity to be heard, I'd collect a list of tips to share with others so they don't have to feel the frustration that often comes along with regret.

Slow Lens Getting You Down? The New Fotodiox Speedbooster Can Give You an Extra Stop for Just $160

Slow Lens Getting You Down? The New Fotodiox Speedbooster Can Give You an Extra Stop for Just $160

Yes, you heard right. The newly announced Fotodiox Excell +1 speedbooster (reminiciant of the Metabones Speedbooster) will allow you to mount your Nikon F and Canon FD glass to your MFT body while optically adjusting for crop-factor and giving you a whole extra stop of light. At an introductory price of $160 the Fotodiox blows the Metabones, which sells for between $400 to $600, out of the water and you can get that extra stop of light on a budget.

The What, Where, Why, and How Guide to Polarizing Filters

The What, Where, Why, and How Guide to Polarizing Filters

One of the many reasons people become attracted to photography is the capability of capturing the world around us in wondrous ways. While choosing large apertures or developing a dramatic style in post processing can completely change a setting, there are also subtle but supportive ways to change a scene. Such a way is through the use of a circular polarizing filter (CPF). In this well presented and thorough video tutorial, nature photographer Steve Perry of Backcountry Gallery will teach you everything there is to know about this must-have lens filter.

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