Why I'm Naming My Second Born Carl Zeiss Jr. | BTS With Zeiss Lenses

I don't think there is anything sexier in the lens world than the Zeiss 28-80 T2.9 Compact Zoom Lens. Its robust cine-style housing and calibrated focus scales make pulling tack sharp focus a joy. What is lacks in affordability it drastically makes up for in the most epic of  lens performances you can find. If you have the option to rent this on your next shoot, don't think twice. Make sure to check out the Carl Zeiss showreel below as well.

Showreel

The Zeiss Lenses Used

28-80
The 
Zeiss 28-80mm T2.9 Compact Zoom CZ.2 Lens is a standard zoom lens that is optimized for motion picture production. The lens offers full-frame (36 x 24 mm) coverage and exhibits no focus shift over the zoom range. The cine-style housing features calibrated focus scales and industry standard gearing for focus, iris and zoom. At 7.72" long and with a weight of 5.5 lb, the 28-80mm is relatively compact and lightweight, which makes it ideal for handheld and Steadicam applications.

Zeiss Compact Zooms utilize T* anti-reflex coating and internal light traps to suppress flare, and a circular iris renders attractive bokeh. Interchangeable lens mounts are available in PL, Canon EF, Nikon F, Micro 4/3, and Sony E, which means that users are not locked into a single camera system. A range of mounting options and 4K ready optics make the 28-80mm Compact Zoom a versatile and virtually "future proof" lens.

70-200
The 
Zeiss 70-200mm T2.9 Compact Zoom CZ.2 Lens with EF Mount is a telephoto zoom lens that is optimized for motion picture production. The lens offers full-frame (36 x 24 mm) coverage and exhibits no focus shift over the zoom range. The cine-style housing features calibrated focus scales and industry standard gearing for focus, iris and zoom. At 9.84" long and with a weight of 6.2 lb, the 70-200mm is relatively compact and lightweight, which makes it ideal for handheld and Steadicam applications. 
Zeiss Compact Zooms utilize T* anti-reflex coating and internal light traps to suppress flare, and a circular iris renders attractive bokeh. Interchangeable lens mounts are available in PL, Canon EF, Nikon F, Micro 4/3, and Sony E, which means that users are not locked into a single camera system. A range of mounting options and 4K-ready optics make the 70-200mm Compact Zoom a virtually "future proof" lens.

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11 Comments

E Port's picture

Your kid will know the true origin of their name when you ask jr to take out student loans because you chose to buy these lenses instead of saving for their college education.

I know, right? God forbid your kids have to pay their own way and make a life for themselves.

E Port's picture

Joking aside, I had that life and missed out on many opportunities because of it. The middle path is the best way, but being childfree is even better!

Lens lust. Gear lust. Production lust.

Career lust...

There are some amazing shots but I don't get the story and the music. is that just me? (it could have been shot with a vast array of other lenses as wel)

Jeroen Rommelaars's picture

So, I have a 50-200 2.8 stills lens which is lovely. The downside obviously being focus shift, and the focus ring is not optimized for a follow focus, so the lens moves a lot during focusing with a FF. Im looking to counter this by attaching the lens collar to the rig itself, but still looking into that.

Anyways, that lens was under 1000 euros. The lens they use is 20.000 euros. Besides it being lovely and sharp, optimized for a FF and having no focus shift...is it really worth 20 times as much?

Sure, if you have the budget, why not...but can anyone explain to me why this thing is so much more expensive, and why you would need to buy one? (I can understand rental for a high cost production)

Lee Christiansen's picture

Holding focus through the full zoom range is no small thing. It's an essential for film making (even though live zooms are often considered bad form in film making).

The law of diminishing returns means lots of extra ££ for a seemingly small benefit. But when the benefit is so essential, then yes, it's worth it.

Over all, these lenses are things of mechanical and optical beauty. The accuracy of focus and the T-stop calibration are just the sort of things that add to the cost even more.

Most people don't buy these things. Rental houses buy just enough to make them cost effective.

I'm sorry, but I refuse to accept ANY lens priced at $20,000 is "worth it" - that is nothing short of a ridiculously stupid price...

Lee Christiansen's picture

$20,000 for a full broadcast lens is by no means an expensive thing. (I have bought 2 similarly priced lenses in the last couple of years and they've certainly been worth it. Nothing else would have done the job.)

For your applications, perhaps it may be over priced, but for other people it sits just right.

Heck there are some lenses at £150,000 and the people who use them in broadcast would consider them to be worth every penny. There are some people that think my £1700 prime lens is over priced - but I disagree.

Quality costs, and different projects require different standards. At that point, nothing is stupid. After all, you've been enjoying beautiful cinematic productions on the big screen with much more expensive lenses than a mere $20,000...

I think sometimes a price can be stupid when it is based in brand or marketing and not in practical use, like apple computers that sell design instead of functionality compared with pc. I don't know this is the case but perhaps Tara was refering something like this with her comment, knowing that some productions have been made with cheaper equipment is a test that her comment may be right.