A New Sigma Lens Is on the Way

A New Sigma Lens Is on the Way

Who doesn't love a new Sigma lens? The popular company, known for its varied lines of quality, affordable lenses looks to be readying to announce their next lens in just a few days, and it will likely be a popular choice for a wide range of photographers and filmmakers. 

Tamron's 28-75mm f/2.8 Di III RXD lens has been a runaway hit for the company, compromising a bit of focal length on the wide end to produce a lens that is highly portable, sharp, and quite affordable compared to most 24-70mm options. And while Sigma makes a 24-70mm f/2.8 option, that lens is designed more in the vein of traditional 24-70mm lenses. However, the 28-70mm f/2.8 Contemporary lens that is rumored to be announced on February 24 will likely be a direct competitor to the Tamron 28-75mm f/2.8. Sigma's current 24-70mm lens is part of the Art line, which generally means high optical quality with the compromise of large footprints and relatively high prices (for Sigma). On the other hand, Contemporary line lenses tend to be smaller, more lightweight, and cheaper, and with Sigma shaving 4mm off the wide end, it is likely this lens will fit those characteristics. This will probably make it quite popular for anyone who needs an affordable, versatile standard zoom. We'll see what Wednesday brings! 

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18 Comments

Alex Coleman's picture

I'm not really sure I get the point of the compromise here. If it's to go down in size/weight compared to a 24-70 f/2.8, why not just drop to f/4 for a bigger advantage and still be able to keep 24 on the wide end? If you instead want fast tele, an 85 f/1.8 would be faster and a great complement to an f/4 zoom. Losing on the wide end is pretty significant IMO.

Pedro Pulido's picture

i'd rather compose with my feet and lose the 4mm than losing a stop of light actually.

Alex Coleman's picture

That'd be fine if it was 4mm at the long end. At the wide end, I can think of a number of circumstances where you can't get wider as there's something in the way - you can't zoom out with your feet if your back is to a wall.

Never Mind's picture

That's okay, although it's half true. You will never get the same perspective by walking front or back. You'd need to crop/uncrop. You can crop to emulate zoom in, but unfortunately you cannot uncrop to zoom out to get the same perspective as a wider lens at that distance.

Pedro Pulido's picture

i agree with both your perspectives (Never Mind and Alex). And I still value that 1 stop of light more than those 4mm.

JEREMY MOORE's picture

A lot of situations don't allow moving backwards, and you also get different background composition. I'd rather lose 4mil on the long end and crop. The differences would be much smaller than losing 4 on the wide end.

Jacques Cornell's picture

That is my approach as well - dimmer zooms combined with bright primes. In my event work, a sorta bright zoom is never bright enough. f2.8 is a pretty useless aperture for me, because I'll want to either stop down in good light for DoF and sharpness or open up in low light for fast enough shutter speeds. If Tamron would make a 70-180/4 that's smaller and lighter for 2/3 the price of their f2.8, I'd buy it in a nanosecond.

Alex Coleman's picture

Not sure your brand, but the 70-200 f/4 from Canon and Nikon are both very good. Used might put them in the right price range.

Jacques Cornell's picture

Sony a7III/a7RIII and Panasonic GX8/GX9. What are good AF adapters for a Canon EF 70-200/4 (I used to own one) and 135/2 lenses? I'm also interested in a used Canon 200/2.8 L II. Viltrox lists this lens as compatible with their reducing and non-reducing adapters.

Alex Coleman's picture

Sony makes a 70-200 f/4, and I'd prefer native AF over adapted on a tele TBH.

Jacques Cornell's picture

Sure, but it's $1,400 whereas I can pick up a used Canon 70-200 f4L plus Viltrox adapter for about $500-$600. If I were spending >$1000, I'd get the Tamron 70-180/2.8, not because it's bright, but because it's smaller, lighter and cheaper than the Sony f4.

derek j's picture

I like their 35-150, although i keep my 85 1.8 handy as well

Thomas Tucker's picture

The Tamron 28-75/2.8 is hugely popular and sells a ton of units, Sigma wants a piece of that pie and it would be much harder to compete with an f4 lens.

Mike Huberts's picture

I used to like Sigma lenses because of the price. But the autofocus is usually pretty unreliable in my opinion. So I just have to wait and see if this one is an affordable option instead of the one from Canon.

Thomas Tucker's picture

If Canon worked with Sigma instead of against them this wouldn't be a problem. Sony licenses their mount and protocols to Sigma and Tamron which results in native-level performance with 3rd party lenses. Hopefully Canon and Nikon take note but so far it doesn't seem likely.

Mike Huberts's picture

Amen to that! Although Sigma has also produced very lenses with very unreliable autofocus on Sony bodies. So I think that's not the whole problem.

JEREMY MOORE's picture

When I sold cameras 12-20 years ago, their focussing was trash. It's actually really good now. Almost indestinguishable from native brand lenses

Stephen Galaso's picture

I get it. Not too long ago I actually purchased sigma’s 24-70mm and I returned it within a month. It’s a fantastic lens, just too damn bulky for my liking. I’m using an A7c, so yes, I prefer something light and compact. I almost went with the tamron after but decided maybe I’m ok with my zeiss 55mm. I love that prime and it’s very versatile. Keep in mind, I’m not a pro. If I was, then I’d prob be ok with the bulk. I kinda wish sigma didn’t come out with something so close to what they already have. How about a 35-90 f2.8. Think outside the box like tamron has. I would find that range to be very practical especially considering they don’t currently have a 70-200 out, or anything remotely close to that for e-mount. Is this lens even for e-mount, I don’t see the specs anywhere. I guess we find out Wednesday