Why Don't All Cameras Have This Helpful Feature?

Modern cameras, even entry level, are remarkably capable machines, offering a wide variety of useful features for photographers and filmmakers alike. And yet, one basic feature is still left out of many models, despite its tremendous usefulness and popularity. This great video discusses why more cameras should embrace it. 

Coming to you from James Popsys, this excellent video discusses the usefulness and need for fully articulating rear screens on cameras. Fully articulating screens are the sort of feature where once you use one, you will wonder how you ever worked without it. For example, I love them when I am shooting events and need to get a shot above the crowd. Rather than holding the camera above my head and hoping for the best while I blindly aim it, I can use the screen to see exactly what I am shooting. Similarly, you can use the screen for getting low shots without having to lay on the ground or strain yourself. Many top-level cameras, such as Canon's 1D series, keep their screens flush to the body for durability's sake, but beyond that, I can't imagine any reason why someone wouldn't want one. Check out the video above for Popsys' full thoughts. 

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10 Comments
Bjarne Solvik's picture

Because not all like and want? Some are sorry YouTube reviewers have been wining about this for ever. Because we like to have the screen behind the lens and not on the side of the camera. A73 have a better screen mount then A74. But now that already is pretty much a lost case. Maybe some of the most pro models will not, but it should be articulated, That’s the best compromise. But did you not know this?

Timothy Linn's picture

Wait what? A YouTuber wants a flippy screen on every camera? Shocking! Flippy screens do have advantages but for many—myself included—the disadvantages outweigh them. I went from an X-T3 with a 3-way tilt design to an R5. The R5's flippy screen interferes with L-brackets, it makes me far more conspicuous when shooting street with the rear screen, it is much more vulnerable to damage, it is way off of the lens axis, and is slower to use. There are many things I miss about my X-T3 since the switch to the R5 and its 3-way tilt LCD is definitely near the top of the list.

Timothy Linn's picture

Wait what? A YouTuber wants a flippy screen on every camera? Shocking! Flippy screens do have advantages but for many—myself included—the disadvantages outweigh them. I went from an X-T3 with a 3-way tilt design to an R5. The R5's flippy screen interferes with L-brackets, it makes me far more conspicuous when shooting street with the rear screen, it is much more vulnerable to damage, it is way off of the lens axis, and is slower to use. There are many things I miss about my X-T3 since the switch to the R5. Its 3-way tilt LCD is definitely near the top of the list.

Stuart C's picture

Youtubers are the cornerstone of professional photography requirements, didn’t you know?

Juan Isaias Perez's picture

My very first articulating screen is on my R5. I though that I would used it only during landscape compositions or very low angles. I am surprised by how frequently I use it. I think sometimes that I have turned my R5 into a view camera. I simply absolutely love the Freedom for composition allowed by the flip screen.

PS: I have programmed the flip screen max brightness toggle to the depth of field preview button. So when I use the flip screen in bright daylight a single button press give me perfect clarity on the screen and as quickly turn it off to save battery. You may want to try this if you use the flip screen frequently.

Ken Yee's picture

Panasonic has the best design so far...it's a combo of the two....

Penny Fan's picture

Oh Please.....X-T3 3 way tilt design is the best for photographer's camera so far, we DON'T NEED a fully articulated screen, it doesn't aligned to the lens when flipped out and got in the way of shooting easily. It's a feature for selfie video people...

Wolfgang Post's picture

I would love to have both :) - There are situations where the 3-way tilt is better suited than the fully articulated version, and sometimes it's the latter one.

Jacob H.'s picture

Like everything in life, there are pros and cons to either solution. When you use a camera vlogging style, I can certainly see the benefit of a fully articulating screen. No tilt screen can give you that experience.

However as a stills photographer, I prefer a two-way tilt screen at any time. In fact, when the X-T4 was launched it was for me one of the reasons to not update my Fuji X-cameras, but move to another brand. Fully articulating screens get in the way of L-plates, connection ports and straps and give you an off-center/angled and less compact view position. As I'm using tilting screens mostly for low viewing positions in both landscape and portrait orientation, I dislike the fully articulating screen as it requires me to fold-out and make that awkward turn/flip.

When you're a videographer (not a vlogger) the fully articulating screen is not the obvious choice either. Since your camera is mostly rigged and on a gimbal, there's no room for fully articulating screens. Whenever you have an external recorder on top of that, there's no need for fully articulating either.

I love the solution that Panasonic offers on their S1(R) line. Two-way tilt and sturdy enough to even carry your camera.

Paulus van Aken's picture

What I Saw in you clip does NOT convince me it's useful.
My D500 has a flipscreen, I sometimes use it for very low point of view, and one time(1) for a over the head shot. Those swiveling things are less reliable, I should think, so yes, I'm glad it is not on every camera.