The Sony a7S III Is Almost the Perfect Camera

The Sony a7S III Is Almost the Perfect Camera

The Sony a7S III was just announced and it's so close to being my "perfect" camera. 

I would love to own multiple copies of a single camera that can cover all of our photo/video needs but right now, we shoot stills with Sony and Nikon cameras and we shoot our videos with Panasonic GH5s. I was planning to switch over to Canon and buy a few R5s or R6s until I learned about them overheating... I'm not willing to deal with that again. 

When Sony announced the a7S III, I got excited because it could be my perfect hybrid camera. In the video below, I went live to discuss the features of this camera and compare it to Canon's offerings. 

During my live video, multiple people told me I needed to see Gerald Undone's review of the a7S III. It is quite good and he does a great job of getting me excited about this camera. 

I wish the Sony a7S III was a little larger and easier to hold, I wish it had around 20 megapixels instead of just 12, and I wish it was $2,500, rather than $3,500. But, those are really my only complaints currently, and I'm excited to test this camera out for myself. 

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76 Comments

Peter Perry's picture

Yeah, So, it’s a Sony... I
Therefore, it’s not really a camera. It’s more like a machine that takes pictures, so I’m not sure if your statement is accurate.

Deleted Account's picture

Maybe he's talking about the fact Sony designs cameras the same way they design all their other machines. No soul. I think that's what their customers want but I could be wrong and often am.

Thatcher Freeman's picture

How would you know if a camera has soul or was designed with soul?

Deleted Account's picture

It's a Canikon thing. ;-)
Joking aside, for me, mirrorless cameras have no soul, regardless the manufacturer. They're all about the technical, and do that pretty well, but, alas, no soul.

Charles J's picture

The same can be said about DSLR in relation to film cameras.

Alexander Petrenko's picture

The same can be said about film cameras in relation to the painting.

Euan Gray's picture

Painting on canvas doesn't have the soul of daubs on cave walls...

Deleted Account's picture

:-D

Mike Shwarts's picture

Daubs on cave walls have no soul compared to the creation (using the term loosely) of the universe(s).

Lee Christiansen's picture

You think storage space for digital media is expensive...?
You should try storing all those cave walls... :)

Deleted Account's picture

I was a little pensive about making the original comment but now I'm glad! These comments are too funny! :-D

Alexander Petrenko's picture

For me, people without portfolio have no soul. It’s just my opinion though.

Cool Cat's picture

For me a camera has soul when everything is so thoughtfully designed that everything is tightly integrated within itself.

Pieter Batenburg's picture

What kind of horsebugger are you talking. Cameras having souls. What have you been smoking?
A camera is a tool to get a job done.

Deleted Account's picture

I'm assuming horsebugger is a made up word to illustrate a point, similar to saying a camera has a soul or not.
That being said, you've made my point for me. For a lot of people, and there's nothing wrong with this, a camera is, in fact, just a tool to get a job done. For others, a dying breed for sure, tools, whether photographic or otherwise, help to create an experience, rather than just for achieving a goal.
I wish I could think of a better analogy, 'cause this one sucks, but it's kinda like having sex with a whore versus making love to your wife. One is a tool to get a job done and the other isn't.

Lee Christiansen's picture

My camera has no soul. But he does have a name. He's called Bob. :)

Sam Sims's picture

What’s all this madness about a soul? All I can tell you is since upgrading from a Canon 6D to an A7III it has made a vast improvement to my workflow and enjoyment. It hasn’t improved my photo taking ability but certain features make it more of a joy to use than the DSLR’s I was using before.

Deleted Account's picture

Since you voted my previous comment down, you've obviously read it so I can't add anything else. It's all good.

Sam Sims's picture

Sorry, that was a mistake, now corrected. Your ‘sex‘ analogy was quite weird though.

Deleted Account's picture

I know. I wish I could think of a better one. I thought about film vs digital but that's so obvious, I didn't think it would help.

Peter Perry's picture

I don’t doubt going from a 6D to an A7 III would improve your workflow, but if you haven’t tried something like a Pentax K1000 in Film, or a Fuji X-T, then you will never understand why the Fuji is so much fun to use.

I returned the A7 III, not because it wasn’t a competent machine, it had fast AF and good image quality, it just wasn’t very much fun to use.

For me, I don’t want to do this for a living, because the last hobby I turned into a career ended up taking the fun out of my hobby... So to me, the camera absolutely has to be a fun machine to shoot with.

Sam Sims's picture

Having owned a Pentax ME Super film camera many years ago, I am aware how having dials are so immediate and convenient and even ‘fun’ to use. I went with Sony mainly for the lens choices and native Voigtlander’s in particular (EXIF data with manual lenses) as I like manual lenses, even though the Fuji dials are a nice feature. It took me some time though when I first owned a digital SLR to get used to (read: put up with) being bombarded with loads of menus verses the simplicity of film cameras. At least with the A7III I have shutter speed and ISO on a couple of dials plus aperture on the lens and a few other options on the custom menus. I turn off the LCD screen when out taking photographs and it a pretty good, uninterruptible workflow. Tbh, being able to zone focus like I used to with a film camera is the joy I get from this setup.

David Penner's picture

A camera is supposed to do its job. Thats it. Clients dont care about the soul of the equipment they are using and if they are I'd most likely get super annoyed being around them.

Deleted Account's picture

Not everyone is a professional photographer. In fact, the vast majority of photographers are not professionals. They do it for enjoyment and the camera they use is a large part of that. As for you getting annoyed being around anyone, I hope you'll understand if not everyone notices or cares. ;-)

John Adams's picture

Where did you lose your brain?

Peter Perry's picture

Was that statement to deep for you?

Sony’s bodies are machines that attempt to do just about everything for you, they’re not cameras in the traditional sense, and those of us that don’t actually want our photography equipment to do everything for us, recognize that.

Deleted Account's picture

I was going to say that but, well... I got off on a tangent. :-D

John Adams's picture

Do you realize how stupid you sound? May I ask how old are you? Maybe your age has something to do with it.

Peter Perry's picture

Boy with questions like that, and your first question, I think you should find a mirror buddy!

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