What A Timelapse On Acid Looks Like In Alaska's Northern Lights

Aurora Borealis actually means dawn of the north, and can best be seen during peak winter months around the magnetic North Pole. The peak season of this spectacular event happens once every 11 years with the last peak season being the winter of 2013. If you are like me and were unable to witness this in person, check out this pretty beautiful timelapse from Alexis Coram that can only be described as light version of a Hunter S. Thompson dream.  Timelapses are incredibly difficult and time consuming to do correctly. If you are interested in learning more about executing flawless timelapses, here is a great video from Preston Kanak to get you started.

About the Video And Note From Alexis Coram

There are some things in this world that everyone deserves to experience with their own eyes. I headed to Alaska in February with the hope of catching a glimpse of the Northern Lights with mine. That glimpse turned into an extravaganza...a party in the sky, and I was an onlooker, a face in the crowd...awestruck, mesmerized, feeling like the luckiest girl in the world. Night after night I was captivated by bright and colorful lights dancing wistfully above me; a graceful representation of the light in my soul. These were enchanted nights like I've never experienced. And while my camera captured a play-by-play of the spectacle, I could be found dog sledding through snow-covered forests, relaxing by the fire in a toasty cabin, or simply laying down in the snow and drifting into the dance.

This was the most amazing trip of my life so far...and here it is, summarized in under 3 minutes. This is my first time time lapse film, so it means a lot that you're here, reading this, stepping into a very special piece of my past.
Thank you. x

Photography & Production by AlexisCoram
AlexisCoram.SmugMug.com/Landscape/Alaska
Facebook.com/AlexisCoram1

Music "Out of Darkness" by James Everingham
Licensed from jameseveringham.com/license/

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4 Comments

Just to add: the peak isn't necessarily the winter months, though that IS when the skies tend to be clearest (low humidity) and darkest (less daylight). But the aurora activity itself tends to peak around each equinox, and corresponds to the 11 year solar cycle (of which we're now at max and about to start sliding toward a minimum over the next half-decade).

Gary Martin's picture

Awesome! Thanks for adding

HAARP? :-P