Documentary

'Planet Earth II' Is BBC's Most Cinematic Series Yet, Here's How

'Planet Earth II' Is BBC's Most Cinematic Series Yet, Here's How

How did technology make "Planet Earth" so much more cinematic? If we go back to how it was done back in the day and compare it to the technology we have today, it's quite a leap. Back in the day 35mm was the broadcast standard. The 35mm cameras were bulky and heavy, they were perfect for studio and not for the shots that they needed. In the filming circles and the BBC insiders saw 16mm film as being for amateurs. But, thanks to David Attenborough first taking his 16mm camera out to shoot abroad and coming back with footage of animals never filmed before, it changed opinions. This made the program that later became one of the best wildlife documentaries of all time.

'Boyfriends of Instagram' BTS Project Goes Viral

'Boyfriends of Instagram' BTS Project Goes Viral

Last year, my husband and I traveled to Greece. While we were in Athens, we could not avoid crossing paths with the same couple at every sightseeing location we went to. I must have seen the entire wardrobe of the girl during those hours we walked. Her eccentric wardrobe change was not the only thing that caught my attention. It was rather strange to witness an all dressed-up girl posing alone non-stop. To me, it was definitely meant for social media.

One Model, Two Photographers: Gender Debate or Just Artisitic Differences

One Model, Two Photographers: Gender Debate or Just Artisitic Differences

This past summer I dove deep into an article on the long time debate: does a photographer's gender alter the way in which he or she photographs a subject. Is there really a difference in how one gender sees the final image, or is it just artistic preference? Two artists decided to test this theory during a creative shootout to see if all the variables stayed the same, would the image turn out differently. Does the gender of the photographer really influence the final image, or simply the approach in which is taken during the shoot?

Stairways That Take You Back to the Future

Stairways That Take You Back to the Future

Balint Alovits is a photographer based in Budapest, Hungary who created a showcase of Bauhaus and Art Deco caracoles. He calls them "Time Machines." He assures me that these stairways really exist and that they aren't computer generated. He found their location online at first, but then developed a special sense, knowing if he saw the ornate front doors or large glass paneling, there was a good chance there was a special stairway inside too.

Tips for Scouting Locations for Your Next Interview Video Shoot

Tips for Scouting Locations for Your Next Interview Video Shoot

When doing a documentary-style video production, an interview or series of interviews is often at the heart of the content. Uncontrollable lighting, background noise, and the size of the space you have to work in all play a significant role in capturing a quality testimonial, so location scouting to check on these is an important facet of our production process. In this short video, Joshua Pardon and I explore two rooms at a location and discuss what we look for when making a decision on where to set up for a shoot.

'Spy in the Wild', a New BBC Series uses Animatronic Animals Rigged with Cameras to Film Wildlife

'Spy in the Wild', a New BBC Series uses Animatronic Animals Rigged with Cameras to Film Wildlife

A new upcoming BBC four-part series titled "Spy in the Wild" uses 34 realistic animatronic creatures, equipped with UHD cameras to observe wildlife activity from closer than ever before. The myriad of undercover animals were placed all over our planet, from deserts, to rainforests, as well as the polar regions. With the intention to record real animal emotions, display their similarities with humans, and acknowledge the links between all living things on earth. The topics discussed for each of the four episodes include love, friendships, mischief, and intelligence.

Why I'm Starting a 365 Day Project in 2017

Why I'm Starting a 365 Day Project in 2017

I’ll admit that I’m in a creative rut. And like any photographer that feels frustrated, there’s only one thing to do: go in a different direction. For well over a year I’ve been shooting hardly anything besides studio portraits. While I love that genre and the work that I’ve created in that time, I feel like my work has hit a wall creatively. After watching several photographers and filmmakers doing these a-photo-a-day projects, I decided to give it a go in 2017.

Photoshelter Helped 44 Photographers Tell Their Stories in 2016

Photoshelter Helped 44 Photographers Tell Their Stories in 2016

Every year photographers launch personal projects. Some of the projects will have tremendous impact by artistically contributing to our world. Naturally, many of the projects need funding and now, more than ever, the photo community is pitching in to ensure that the projects are seen by a greater audience. But it isn’t just individuals and fellow photographers funding the photo projects. This year, Photoshelter quietly contributed funds to help 44 individual photographers complete and share their work.