Documentary

'Spy in the Wild', a New BBC Series uses Animatronic Animals Rigged with Cameras to Film Wildlife

'Spy in the Wild', a New BBC Series uses Animatronic Animals Rigged with Cameras to Film Wildlife

A new upcoming BBC four-part series titled "Spy in the Wild" uses 34 realistic animatronic creatures, equipped with UHD cameras to observe wildlife activity from closer than ever before. The myriad of undercover animals were placed all over our planet, from deserts, to rainforests, as well as the polar regions. With the intention to record real animal emotions, display their similarities with humans, and acknowledge the links between all living things on earth. The topics discussed for each of the four episodes include love, friendships, mischief, and intelligence.

Why I'm Starting a 365 Day Project in 2017

Why I'm Starting a 365 Day Project in 2017

I’ll admit that I’m in a creative rut. And like any photographer that feels frustrated, there’s only one thing to do: go in a different direction. For well over a year I’ve been shooting hardly anything besides studio portraits. While I love that genre and the work that I’ve created in that time, I feel like my work has hit a wall creatively. After watching several photographers and filmmakers doing these a-photo-a-day projects, I decided to give it a go in 2017.

Photoshelter Helped 44 Photographers Tell Their Stories in 2016

Photoshelter Helped 44 Photographers Tell Their Stories in 2016

Every year photographers launch personal projects. Some of the projects will have tremendous impact by artistically contributing to our world. Naturally, many of the projects need funding and now, more than ever, the photo community is pitching in to ensure that the projects are seen by a greater audience. But it isn’t just individuals and fellow photographers funding the photo projects. This year, Photoshelter quietly contributed funds to help 44 individual photographers complete and share their work.

Incredible New Aerial Photos Reveal Tribe Living in Isolation in South American Jungle

Incredible New Aerial Photos Reveal Tribe Living in Isolation in South American Jungle

New photos have emerged showcasing the lives of an uncontacted tribal community living in the Brazilian Amazon. The Yanomami Indians, who have taken residence near the Venezuelan border since 1992, are said to be a community of approximately 100 people. They were reportedly at risk of being wiped out in recent years by violent attacks carried out by illegal miners, who had been invading the land in search of gold. The release of these images reveal the tribe are now alive and well, even having increased their population, after concerns grew for the group following their decision to live in total isolation.

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