Everyone Should Try Splash Photography at Least Once: Here's How to Get Started

With a basic clear tank or transparent plastic sheet, there are several creative ways to photograph water just waiting to be explored. These techniques can be as basic or intricate as you want them to be.

In this video, Leo Rosas for COOPH shares four different ways to get creative with water. From the classic freeze-frame water droplet photo to making globe-like effects, Rosas demonstrates them all in a behind-the-scenes look so that you can try them out yourself. If it’s been a while since you tried something new with your photography, this is an easy way to create something different and also rewarding.

Obviously this quick video is setting up some general ideas for photographing water, but one thing that I’ll add is to just keep at it if you enjoy it. It’s one thing to do a rainy day session exploring a new photographic style, however if you keep at it long enough you will find that personal creativity starts poking its head out. Soon enough you’ll develop preferences for what you think works best and looks best, which will lead into a big thing for fine art photographers: repeatable technique.

Share your own water macro tricks in the comments below.

Photo by Pixabay via Pexels.

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3 Comments

Eric M's picture

Image one: Single speedlite with a green gel on it bouncing off a white board. No fancy dropper, just a plastic bag with a pin hole and a cable release.
Image two: Same as above but with a second speedlite with a blue gel. Each light is set to to light one half of the white board.
Image three: same as image two, different capture.

Mark Harris's picture

I use a laser-interrupt trigger to get timing consistent. This image of a melting icicle was inspired by my company name "Frozentime Images". Based in Sweden, which is also frozen, and has a blue and yellow flag...

Here are two Images I created the other day.