Tamron Announces New Ultra-Wide and Tele-Zoom Lenses

Tamron Announces New Ultra-Wide and Tele-Zoom Lenses

I'll be the first to admit that even though I've used them, I've never owned a professional-grade Tamron lens. I've stuck with Nikon through the years based on a probably-unfounded feeling that Nikon cameras would work better with Nikon lenses, and also because I really like the five-year warranty that comes with them. I may have to change that philosophy soon, though, because there have been some great third-party manufacturer lenses released in the past few years. Tamron has just announced two new lenses. Will they be up to snuff, or is it all talk? Here's what's new.

SP 70-200mm F/2.8 Di VC USD G2 (Model A025)

Nikon's announcement of their new 70-200mm f/2.8 lens last year met some criticism based on its price. For a lens type that's popular among photographers, $2800 is a lot  to ask for. Tamron's new version of its 70-200mm f/2.8 is priced a lot more moderately. For $1300, here are some of the improvements you'll see when the lens is available in March:

Upgrades:

  • Increased autofocus speed and precision.
  • Improved vibration compensation (up to 5 stops!) with three different modes.
  • Shortened minimum focus distance (down a little over a foot from its predecessor).

New Features:

  • Tamron's original eBAND (Extended Bandwidth & Angular-Dependency) Coating, which improves the lens's resistance to flares and ghosting. 
  • Moisture-proof and Dust-Resistant Construction with new sealants.
  • Flourine coating on front element for better water/oil resistance and ease of cleaning
  • Compatibility with Tamron teleconverters -- a welcomed feature for wildlife shooters and those who need an extra bit of reach
  • Electromagnetic diaphragm control for Nikon mounts (already available on Canon mounts)

SPECIFICATIONS

Model

 A025

Focal Length

 70-200mm

Maximum Aperture

 F/2.8

Angle of View (diagonal)

 34°21' - 12°21' (for full-frame format)

 22°33' - 7°59' (for APS-C format)

Optical Construction

 23 elements in 17 groups

Minimum Object Distance

 37.4 in  (0.95m)

Maximum Magnification Ratio

 1:6.1

Filter Size

 Ø77mm

Maximum Diameter

 Ø88mm

Length[5]

 for Canon 7.6 in (193.8mm)

 for Nikon 7.5 in (191.3mm)

Weight[6]

 for Canon 52.9 oz  (1,500g)

 for Nikon 52.4 oz  (1,485g)

Aperture Blades

 9 (circular diaphragm)

Minimum Aperture

 F/22

Image Stabilization Performance

 5 stops (CIPA Standards Compliant) using VC MODE 3

(For Canon : EOS-5D MKIII is used / For Nikon : D810 is used)

Standard Accessories

 Lens hood, Lens caps, Lens case, Detachable tripod mount

Compatible Mounts

 Canon, Nikon

10-24mm F/3.5-4.5 Di II VC HLD (Model B023)

Along with a new version of the (I assume) most popular fast telephoto zoom lens comes the announcement of a new version of Tamron's 10-24mm ultra-wideangle lens (from 2008) for APS-C (crop-sensor) DSLRs. 

Upgrades:

  • Improved optical performance, including Tamron's BBAR (Broad-Band Anti-Reflection) Coating for lens elements and tweaked element design, will lead to sharper images with less ghosting and flare. Ultra-wideangle lenses tend to be bad about this, so this is a welcome improvement.
  • A little bit shorter than its predecessor. 

New Features:

  • The addition of vibration compensation (up to 4 stops)!
  • New autofocus drive: Tamron's HLD (High/Low torque modulated Drive) is now in play, which upgrades the power and stability of the autofocus system, and adds full-time manual focus override without having to switch between modes.
  • Flourine-coated front element, moisture-resistant construction, and electromagnetic diaphragm system for Nikon-mounts, just like the big boy above.

SPECIFICATIONS

Model

 B023

Focal Length

 10-24mm

Maximum Aperture

 F/3.5-4.5

Angle of View (diagonal)

 108°44'- 60°2' (for APS-C format)

Optical Construction

 16 elements in 11groups

Minimum Object Distance

 9.4 in  (0.24m)

Maximum Magnification Ratio

 1:5.3

Filter Size

 Ø77mm

Maximum Diameter

 Ø83.6mm

Length[3]

 for Canon 3.3 in  (84.6mm)

 for Nikon 3.2 in  (82.1mm)

Weight

 for Canon 15.5 oz  (440g)

 for Nikon 15.5 oz (440g)

Aperture Blades

 7 (circular diaphragm)

Minimum Aperture

 F/22-29

Image Stabilization Performance

 4 Stops (CIPA Standards Compliant)

For Canon: EOS-80D is used / For Nikon: D7200 is used

Standard Accessories

 Lens hood, Lens caps

Compatible Mounts

 Canon, Nikon

Both of these lenses are compatible with Tamron's TAP-in console, which lets you plug the lens in via USB to update firmware and fine-tune the autofocus and vibration compensation systems.

Will you be picking up one of these lenses?

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19 Comments

Ryan Cooper's picture

If the 70-200 is near or on par with Nikon's new 70-200, il buy one in a heart beat.

Anonymous's picture

I had the old 70-200 and it was a great lens. I sold it because I could only fine tune the focus on one Tamron lens and that slot was already taken. Tamron and Sigma's USB docks? I don't know...

Spy Black's picture

If these lenses deliver in performance and IQ, they just made their Nikon and Canon counterparts obsolete. If they're good those prices are amazing. Too bad they didn't put the zoom ring in the rear on the 70-200.

Anonymous's picture

Yep. Because all the great new Sigma and Tamron lenses have displaced the Canon and Nikon counterparts... :-/

Spy Black's picture

They have, to a degree, actually. I'm referring to these two however, and if these deliver on their performance and IQ claims, they will indeed render their Nikon and Canon counterparts obsolete. Of course, these lenses could also suck, but so far Sigma and Tamron have been on quite a roll. We'll just have to wait and see, won't we?

Anonymous's picture

The 70-200 is definitely awesome given the price. However, I've grown tired hearing folks complain about focus breathing in Nikon's last version. This Tamron is a little worse while Nikon's new version has corrected it to a large degree. Is that worth a bucket full of cash?

The bottom line, in this case at least, is cost (which is huge) and not capability. It seems to me, people needing a 70-200 f/2.8 are less motivated by cash and, as a group, a bit more likely to get the Nikon. Those who just want one, are more likely to go for the Tamron. No different from their respective offerings six months ago.

I don't care anything about the 10-24.

Spy Black's picture

"The bottom line, in this case at least, is cost (which is huge) and not capability."

It's interesting to find you dismissive of something that has not yet been experienced, just because you didn't like an earlier version of a lens you used you associate this one with it.

Anonymous's picture

???
I had, and liked, the earlier Tamron lens. I only sold it due to Nikon's inability to store focus tuning with more than one 3rd party manufacturer's lens at a time. There was little lacking in the old one so the new one can't be a lot better, just like Nikon's version. There just isn't that much room for improvement in either.
The only obvious thing Nikon could improve was focus breathing, which they did.
Tamron? We'll see. I do like the arca swiss foot and, for me, weather sealing is great!

I am NOT dismissing the Tamron and never said the Nikon makes it obsolete. But someone said something like that in reverse. Now WHO was that??? :-)

Spy Black's picture

I never said that you said that the Nikon makes it obsolete. I did say that if this delivers on performance and IQ, it will make the Nikon and Canon counterparts obsolete.

Anonymous's picture

Exactly. You dismissed Nikon's new 70-200, if Tamron delivers on promises that pretty much every manufacturer makes about pretty much every lens they introduce. I'm not dismissing either. Some will want the Nikon (not obsolete) while others will like the Tamron (not dismissed).

Campbell Sinclair's picture

Mate people that buy my photos dont care what lens I have used . Ive sold hundreds of photos using a sigma 70-200mm and now I have a Tamron G1 . If the Tamron G2 is better I'll sell my G1 and get that one. I dont believe the Nikon 70-200's are any better for the price they are asking. I just concentrate on getting a good photo , in focus.

Anonymous's picture

If that works for you, that's great. Everyone has different needs and I would never tell someone what they should or shouldn't use. Some folks need/want the Nikon; others, the Tamron or something else. It's all good and certainly nothing to argue about.

Campbell Sinclair's picture

Thats true and Ive seen too many quality 3rd party lenses get dissed becasue they fail some IQ test. I loved my Sigma until I broke it.

Anonymous's picture

I have two Tamron lenses and two Rokinon lenses, along with a lot of Nikons. Couldn't be happier with them. I just wish I could focus tune both Tamrons but the one, being a macro, I can live with. The Rokinons, of course, are manual focus.

David Collins's picture

I love and use Tamron as they are usually 95% the lenses of the Nikon/Canon equivalents, and usually at half the price. For part timers, it's a great choice.

Campbell Sinclair's picture

Im still may get the Nikon 300mm f2.8 D version. Retails for 3000 bucks used in Aus as Ive heard very mixed reviews for the Sigma equivalent. The Nikon however is just divine by most accounts. Other than that I have the Tamron 24-70 and 70-200mm gen 1 and couldn't be happier.

Anonymous's picture

The Tamron 10-24 is my work horse lens for my interior photography. It was inexpensive which is why I bought it and came with several recommendations from other photographers. The new lens I would like see tested side by side to see how it stacks up against the older lens.

Thomas Starlit's picture

Super cool touch with "Flouring" coating of the lens. Gordon Ramsey will tear this lens to bits

Stephen Ironside's picture

Ha! Oops! Thanks for catching that.