10 Years of the iPhone: How It Has Shaped Photography

10 Years of the iPhone: How It Has Shaped Photography

June 29 of this year will mark the ten-year anniversary of the iPhone's introduction to the world. It has, for better or worse, revolutionized many things about modern life, including how we document it through photos. Here's how the landscape has changed and will continue to evolve.

I'd be lying if I said my iPhone wasn't an integral part of my life. In particular, having a capable camera that so easily integrates with messaging and social media platforms in my pocket at all times eventually made me sell my point and shoot. Some see it as great, some see it as a threat to the industry. Regardless of where you stand, there's no denying the influence mobile phones have had on the market. Take a look at this infographic from Shutterstock for more:

iPhone 10th Anniversary: How the iPhone Changed Visual Communication

iPhone 10th Anniversary: How the iPhone Changed Visual Communication

I have to admit that even I was surprised to see that Shutterstock features over one million stock images taken on a phone. If anything, it just reconfirms that the iPhone and its counterparts will continue to make inroads in the professional space, and the landscape will continue to evolve. Do you use your phone professionally? Tell us about it in the comments. 

[via The Shutterstock Blog]

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2 Comments

Replace Iphone by Mobile Phone and I would completely agree with you. But putting Iphone in the title suggest that the Iphone is the big game changer and I highly doubt that. There is some clear bias in this which isn't justified by the facts but that can, I think, be expected from an Apple fanboy. They seem more or less inclined to ignore facts and think Apple is God. If you look at the worldwide market shares, Apple is however only a small player.
So probably the title should read: .... years of mobile phones: How Android Has Shaped Photography.

The era of easy to use smartphones that had decent point and shoot cameras started with the iPhone and competition drove the products across the landscape to get better and better. If the iPhone didn't exist the smartphone category of product would stagnate. Not because Android manufactures wouldn't innovate but because they'd not have much reason to. It all comes down to marketing. Apple set a benchmark of making things very simple to understand which is key to people feeling like their crappy pocket camera was as capable as they dreamed it could be.