Photographer's Protest Leads to Facebook Admitting It Is Reviewing Its Policy on Nudity

Photographer's Protest Leads to Facebook Admitting It Is Reviewing Its Policy on Nudity

A backlash from photographers has this week seen Facebook agree to reconsider its policy on nudity within images hosted on the social network site. The furore followed Facebook’s decision to ban “artistic nudity” in photos. (NSFW).

The National Coalition Against Censorship (NCAC) said on the matter:

In recent months, Facebook has faced scrutiny for its community guidelines and censorship practices. The site’s policies, which make an exception for nudity in paintings and sculptures, exclude photography. Photographers reported having their accounts and photos deleted without warning or explanation.

The NCAC and photographer Spencer Tunick, who is well-known for his nude shoots, partnered together last weekend for a campaign entitled #WeTheNipple. In response to the new, stricter policy, Tunick held one of his trademark nude shoots right outside Facebook’s New York City offices, so as to ensure there was no way the company could miss his mission statement.

A grand total of 125 models stripped naked, posing with huge photos of male nipples covering their modesty. It’s well known that Facebook – and sister platform Instagram – have a policy that works against female nipples. As such, the female protestors decided to wear male nipple stickers over their own nipples in an attempt to highlight how ludicrous the rule is.

In its Community Standards document, Facebook says:

We restrict the display of nudity or sexual activity because some people in our community may be sensitive to this type of content. Our nudity policies have become more nuanced over time. […] While we restrict some images of female breasts that include the nipple, we allow other images, including those depicting acts of protest, women actively engaged in breast-feeding, and photos of post-mastectomy scarring. We also allow photographs of paintings, sculptures, and other art that depicts nude figures.

The social media giant has since agreed to meet with a group of artists and activists with the sole intention of discussing its policies, and whether they could potentially be changed.

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1 Comment

Dylan Bishop's picture

Disembodied nipples. That does not look right. Kinda creepy. Or just gross.