Share Your Favorite Photo of 2019

Share Your Favorite Photo of 2019

A new decade is only days away, so it's time to celebrate the creativity of the past and get ready for the future by sharing your favorite photo of 2019. 

2020 always seemed like a date from science fiction novels to me, and here we are about to be living in it. No flying cars, unfortunately, but we have had advances in image making and editing that have made the photographic arts more accessible and varied than ever before. As a result, the definition of what makes a photograph, or a photographer, has become increasingly blurry around the edges. Personally, I'm a big fan of the changes, because it's opened up worlds of creativity. What I have to ask myself now is: What will the next ten years look like? What changes can we expect to see, what new obstacles will we have to navigate, what opportunities will arise for us to take advantage of? As we get ready to head into this new decade, this is a great time to look back and the awesome stuff we've created and consider what the next ten years might hold for photography.

To that end, I put out the word on Facebook and asked Fstoppers community members to show me their favorite photograph of 2019, and I want you to do the same. It doesn't have to be your best technical image, or your highest paid image, though it's certainly fine if that's the case! Sometimes it's a favorite because it captured a special moment, or the instant you learned something that will forever change how you work, or the shot you've been trying to pull off for months.

This is a personal favorite of mine from 2019. I love the image itself, but it's also my favorite for another reason. In a way, it's a symbol of where my photography is headed now that I have a dedicated space to work in. It's also the culmination of finally having the time and the focus to get creative after having kiddos in the house for 16 years. I know more about who I am and what I want as an artist, and I've finally arrived at a time when I have both the skill, the equipment, and the time to create it. For me, 2020 will be the start of a new era in my personal work, and I'm incredibly excited to see what it brings.

Model Jason Klein with props by Gryndel Ghoulderson



What about you? What was your favorite creation of 2019, and does the new decade represent a change in direction for you, or maybe just the hope of new beginnings and bigger and better things to come? Share your photo in the comments and let the community, and the world, know what you've got in store for us in the new decade! Let's end 2019 with a photographic bang and inspire one another to new heights for the new year. 

To motivate you, I asked Fstoppers community members to share some of their favorite photos of 2019. Join the fun!


Lead image shared with permission of Kate Woodman

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130 Comments

Previous comments
Deleted Account's picture

You can do better.

Apparently responding to the personal attacks of people who are too lazy or too stupid to comprehend is also unacceptable.

Jason Frels's picture

Before you made your original comment, you might have asked yourself "is this really worth posting?" It offered nothing of real value, just you stating that you don't like something. Who cares? How does that contribute. I stand by my crotchety statement.

Deleted Account's picture

You mean as opposed to the photo you posted below. Or for that matter the posts where you are determined to provoke an argument with me.

If are going to hold a value standard/requirement then you are going to have a bad day.

Nicole York's picture

Actually man, these photos are the favorites of the individual photographers who presented them, for a variety of their own reasons. They aren't MY personal favorites. I think you misunderstood the purpose of the article...

Deleted Account's picture

Indeed I did; however, my observation re subjective perception holds.

I think my favourite so far is the guy who says I'm a narcissist because I'm not posting to "encourage" myself.

Daniel Medley's picture

Soft skills.

People skills.

Just something to think about.

Deleted Account's picture

You mean I am required to respond nicely to people who are incapable of understanding what I intend (even after explicit clarification)? If people want to attack me, then cool, I'll play.

That aside, I do not sell my work, and if I did, other photographers would not be my target market.

Daniel Medley's picture

If that's what you got out of it, then there's really not much more to say.

Nicole York's picture

Sure, taste is subjective. That's true. But one has to wonder the utility of stating the obvious. I would imagine that's why you got those responses.

Deleted Account's picture

Apparently it's not "obvious".

But then, one could equally say one has to wonder the point of the expected circle jerk.

Society went and became uselessly soft and sensitive somewhere.

Patrick Rosenbalm's picture

All studio shots of people. Kinda odd to me. Thoughts anyone?

David Pavlich's picture

I noticed this as well. This kind of thing is really subjective. Perhaps the author enjoys portraiture above all other forms of photography. That's fine. I like good studio work, but it's very controlled, so getting that 'perfect shot' isn't nearly as difficult as, say, getting a snowy owl diving on a vole hiding in a foot of snow. That's the sort of shot that makes me smile.

I also like when someone waits for that perfect moment while taking a landscape shot like the one above, the night shot. That requires huge amounts of patience. Like that shot, going back to a specific spot time after time and not getting the desired results can be frustrating. But at some point, it happens.

This isn't my favorite of this year, but it's one of those shots that I anticipated would eventually happen. We have a friend that has a condo here in Winnipeg that faces west, so whenever we visit, I always take my camera hoping for a Sunset. This evening, it happened.

Nicole York's picture

Just to make it clear: the photos I shared were the ones shared with me by other folks in the community. I didn't go looking for my personal favorites of other people's work.

Second: yes, the studio is a much more controlled setting, I will give you that, but at the same time EVERYTHING that happens in the studio has to come from the photographer's mind. We aren't working with what nature has presented to us, we are creating an entire scenario. I shoot both in and out of studio, so I don't have a preference, but I think both methods have their difficulties and strengths.

Daniel Medley's picture

It's all subjective and according to one's personal aesthetic. For example, there is rarely a landscape or still life that makes me take notice. To me, they are just boring. Whereas photos of people, even in a studio setting, have the potential to be of much more interest to me.

But again, it all comes down to personal aesthetic.

I tend to disagree with the statement, "... so getting that 'perfect shot' isn't nearly as difficult as, say, getting a snowy owl diving on a vole hiding in a foot of snow."

I do appreciate the difficulties of getting that shot of the snowy owl, but it's a different thing and no more difficult than capturing the right moment in a studio portrait. Sure, from a technical standpoint, controlling the lighting and having the ability to have do-overs, as it were, is going to be easier in a studio, but working with a model--either experienced or inexperienced--can be extremely challenging to produce what I feel is a meaningful emotion that I want to capture.

It's not unheard of to spend several hours and take a few hundred shots in a studio and only walk away with 4 or 5 photos that really have impact and give me a wow moment (according to my personal aesthetic).

Patrick Rosenbalm's picture

Thanks for the replies everyone! Very good points all around. Superb sunset David!
Here's what I think is my best for 2019.
https://fstoppers.com/photo/417944

Jason Frels's picture

This is my favorite image that I took in 2019

It probably has a lot to do with the memory of being at Big Bend that morning and seeing the scene and enjoying the layers of hills and mountains in the distant haze.

Nicole York's picture

Love seeing those hills fade into the distance! I bet it was incredible standing there to witness.

David Pavlich's picture

This is my favorite of 2019. I told my wife the first time I saw this church that I would go back to get a winter shot. Took this last February.

David Pavlich's picture

Thanks for the kind words!

Nicole York's picture

You're most welcome!
I love the contrast and the almost graphic, illustrative feel. I hope it's hanging on you wall somewhere ;)

David Pavlich's picture

Yes, it is...a 16X24. :-)

Deleted Account's picture

Whoa! The church floats in abstractness. Very nice.

David Pavlich's picture

Thanks for the kind words!

Nicole York's picture

Love the color grade and feeling in this shot. Really makes you wonder why this dude is there and what happened to get him to this point. Nicely done!

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