'Stare' - Portraits in Motion

Portraits - they've been the means of capturing the likeness and essence of their subjects since the inception of the camera, and even long before for the subjects of many paintings done though out the span of history. Over the years, the posing, techniques, the lighting, and even more recently, the psychology behind the photos has absolutely evolved to affect every aspect of how portraits are captured. One thing hasn't changed though as much and that's the medium. Fast forward to now, and bring into the frame, Marcelo Mandruca, a photographer from Sao Paolo, Brazil that made his subjects believe they were posing for a long exposure project, but he was in fact, recording video for 60 seconds of each of his subjects.

What you get from these brief video clips, is the unashamed opportunity to stare at another persons face, in detail, something that normally in most social settings would be a little awkward to say the least. In these brief glimpses though, you will get to see everything, and I mean absolutely everything in what makes up that persons face, from the little lines and creases you may not have noticed in a regular photograph, to the little tweaks and twitches that everyone's face makes naturally at rest. On Marcelo's website, you can view the entire collection and it's definitely a very different and unique take on one of the oldest art forms around.

video portraits lighting fstoppers

Marcelo's website showing 60 Moving Portraits, each a minute each.

Marcelo's website has the full list of portraits available for you to check out and I highly encourage you to check it out and let me know what you think in the comments below! do you find these more captivating than a normal still frame portrait or do you feel like these are more intimate and engaging?

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13 Comments

Anonymous's picture

'More captivating or more intimate and engaging?' No possibility for a negative reaction? JK ;-)

Anonymous's picture

Actually, I watched a few and it was almost as awkward as actually staring at someone. I wasn't embarrassed for me...I felt embarrassed for them, having someone (me) stare at them.

Ryan Pramik's picture

I mean that's always how art has been though, different people will react differently than others. That's the feeling that you get, which I'm sure somebody with a psychology degree would analyze and says means "x" but for me I find it fascinating.

Anonymous's picture

I work with two psych grads and they're always telling me why I do what I do! :-)

I would tell them them leave me alone, you freakin lunatics.

Anonymous's picture

I just smile and (verbally) pat them on the head. :-)

Ryan Pramik's picture

Haha I mean there's always that capability of course :P

Very good. I really liked it. Sometimes a video can capture more than a photograph. Very good lighting

God I miss the natural beauty of women before they started mutilating themselves.

This is cool. I started a similar project 5 years ago and have recently begun revisiting it. They're called 30 Second Exposures. A play on words, but really a visual tribute to a 30 second hug. They're up on Instagram now. I'm in the process of adding elsewhere. @30secexp

Anonymous's picture

I don't know anything about Instagram. Is there a way to see them without being a member or whatever?

yes. you can see them on a webpage, Instagram.com/30secexp or on my youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLVTPwKif-f-bjYQs2YelcLmfe2gCWQiYS Not sure if links get spammed here.

I enjoyed the video. The editing was well done and overall it was compelling. The whole point of art is to make you feel; to connect with you emotionally. Job well done.