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Articles written by Tihomir Lazarov

BTS: Mark Seliger Photographs the Hollywood Stars for Vanity Fair and the 2017 Oscars

BTS: Mark Seliger Photographs the Hollywood Stars for Vanity Fair and the 2017 Oscars

Once again, Vanity Fair teamed up with Mark Seliger to produce iconic photographs of Hollywood stars in a custom-built portrait studio at the 2017 Oscars. The portraits are definitely great, but we as photographers always seek to find the secrets of the masters, such as lighting, camera settings, posing, post-processing, etc. Seliger did the job in four steps. If you follow these steps, it will guarantee you a similar career.

What Is the Difference Between Cinema and Still Lenses?

What Is the Difference Between Cinema and Still Lenses?

The majority of the readers of this article who shoot video probably use still lenses. You might ask yourself why you may need different lenses for video while your existing photography ones work just fine. In this article I'd like to show you certain features of the cinema glass that you probably always wanted subconsciously. Maybe after reading this you'll start saving up the money for one.

Taking More Pictures Will Not Make You a Better Photographer

Taking More Pictures Will Not Make You a Better Photographer

Someone once said that "Your first 10,000 photographs are your worst." This means you have to take lots of pictures to get better in the craft. I don't agree with that. Improving your photography as well as videography skills is often compared to an athlete training. The athlete regularly repeats a number of exercises for certain muscles. Musicians are the same. They train their abilities to play musical instruments by repeating sound sequences and so do singers. All these disciplines repeat and repeat what they do. It has to be the same with photography, right?

Why Cinema Lenses Are Measured With T-Stops And What's the Difference With An F-Stop?

Why Cinema Lenses Are Measured With T-Stops And What's the Difference With An F-Stop?

Cinema glass has always been way more expensive than still camera lenses. Combined with the cinema camera sensors these high end lenses provide an image that's far superior to DSLRs capable of recording video. But yet, there are decent films created with DSLRs with still camera lenses. I'm not going to compare the glass quality here. I'm about to talk only about this peculiar T-stop measure on the cinema lenses while still camera lenses have an f-stop. Why should they differ?