Fstoppers Lighting Diagrams- One Light with Pegboard

Fstoppers Lighting Diagrams- One Light with Pegboard

Pegboard is such a fun material to use when experimenting with lighting. You can change the shape of the light pattern by changing the distance of your light to the pegboard and the distance of the pegboard to your subject. We posted previously about how you can use pegboard to construct an entire backdrop. In this week's diagram I will show you how I used one speedlite and a small strip of pegboard to shape the light in my shoots.

For this shoot with Exitmusic, I used a 2x4' panel of brown pegboard and placed it in front of a red-gelled speedlite to the right of the subjects. As you may notice, the closer the board is to the subject, the smaller the spots of light appear. As they angle away, the become more even and bleed into lines of light.

nick fancher columbus ohio photographer exitmusic

nick fancher product photography columbus ohio jackthreadsThe pegboard is overhead in this product shot I did for JackThreads.

I decided to use the pegboard as a main light in this Day of the Dead shoot. Initially I had three lights going in to the shoot, but two of them, I had discovered, had crapped out on me. I still wanted to shoot my light through the pegboard (which would be turned into shafts of light by the smoke machine I brought) but also have it light the backdrop as well. The wall behind the backdrop was an addition, so there was a five foot space between the top of the wall and the ceiling. This allowed me to rest one end of the pegboard on the wall and clamp the other end to a boom arm. I used a second boom arm to position my speedlite two feet above the pegboard, shooting down on the subject.

nick fancher columbus ohio photographer exitmusic
nick fancher columbus ohio photographer exitmusic

nick fancher product photography jackthreads radiiThis shot was done using two lights. One was shot into a white backdrop, one foot behind brown pegboard and there is an umbrella over the product, with a reflector underneath the glass.

Lighting lessons like this one as well as 25 other lighting diagrams are available in my new e-book, RGLR, The Run & Gun Lighting Resource for $10. 

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8 Comments

Thanks for these posts you put out there man. Inspiring to say the least!

Awesome as always. Let me know if you ever want an assistant. :-)

Eric Pare's picture

very creative :::)

Hank's picture

"Initially I had three lights going in to the shoot, but two of them, I had discovered, had crapped out on me." How does one not check his/her gear? 2 of the 3 strobes were no good?

Hank I assume you live in the same world that I do where shit happens and it always happens when you least expect it. If you dont then please let me know how to get to your planet because it sounds amazing. I personally had a battery fail yesterday. Fully charged at home and put it in my bag. Put it in my camera at a shoot and it didnt register. I have not had time to see if its the actual battery or my charger - but because I brought a spare I didnt have an issue. I have also arrived at a location to have exactly 2 of my nikon sb 600s dead. I thankfully had 3 with me so I was in the exact same situation as Nick in the above example that you so rudely scolded him on. Did I check them? Hell yes. They worked the day before at a shoot. I recharged batteries and expected them to work the next day.
In the world of electronics and gadgets its better to be over geared at times because shit is going to fail when its least convienient.

Hank's picture

buy better gear

Zack Williamson's picture

If you run your business hoping nothing will ever go wrong, Murphy's law is going to come a bite you in the ass, hard. ;)

Fasinating............. I too live in a crap world.......... but as you , the challenges are always more interesting......