Lighting

Fstoppers Reviews the Godox Wistro AD600 Portable Battery-Powered Strobe

Fstoppers Reviews the Godox Wistro AD600 Portable Battery-Powered Strobe
We've seen a flood of high quality battery-powered strobes hit the market over the last few years. Increasingly powerful speedlights like the Nikon SB910 were a great start. More powerful units like the Godox Wistro 360 entered the fray and showed us what a small light could do. These were excellent alternatives to the already successful Paul C. Buff offerings and other options like Elinchrom's Ranger kits. Then, Profoto dropped the B1. We've had Broncolor's offerings since and some "lesser" brands like Phottix and Godox creating budget options. Today, we're going to check out Godox's Wistro AD600 (sold in the US as Flashpoint XPLOR 600).

Fstoppers Reviews the MagBeam Light Modifier from Magmod

Fstoppers Reviews the MagBeam Light Modifier from Magmod

MagMod has quickly become the go to flash modifier for a ton of photographers. Being able to quickly and easily attach grids, gels, and diffusers to your flash via small magnets makes shaping your light super simple. So when MagMod announced the new MagBeam, a lot of people got really excited. So excited that they demolished their $25,000 goal by raising just over $300,000 via their Kickstarter campaign. But does this new modifier live up to the hype?

Gear and Tips for Lighting a Table Scene or Roundtable Discussion

Gear and Tips for Lighting a Table Scene or Roundtable Discussion

In this video from Aputure, DP Julia Swain is invited to share her techniques for lighting a dinner table scene, which are common to film productions, but also have applications in the corporate and documentary video world. After the video, check out some of my own personal examples from lighting a similar setup, but instead for a corporate roundtable with an all black background.

3 Reasons Why You Should Own the Westcott 7-Foot Umbrella

3 Reasons Why You Should Own the Westcott 7-Foot Umbrella

I have always preferred simplicity when it comes to lighting portraits. When connecting with a model or subject, especially when working without assistants, I hate having to deal with several lights or various flags, cutters, and bounce cards. This way I can work the camera and move around without having to worry about tripping over my whole setup, and my subject feels more comfortable without obtrusive equipment crowding them. Also, if the model can move around a little, I feel that I can get far more natural poses when they aren't confined by specific lighting. My favorite lighting tool to "keep it simple" with is the Westcott 7-foot Parabolic Umbrella.

How to Shoot a Dramatic One-Light Portrait

How to Shoot a Dramatic One-Light Portrait

One of the best things a portrait photographer can do is learn how to master a single off-camera light. Most photo shoots don’t allow enough time to set up multiple lights, and when shooting on location, carrying more than one light can be too cumbersome to manage. In this video, we see a very useful way to use one off-camera flash with some simple modifiers to create a dramatic portrait.

Using a Scrim Net to Control Background Brightness

Using a Scrim Net to Control Background Brightness

One of the best ways to achieve a nice soft light on your subjects is to use a scrim. These scrims can range from large reflectors to giant sheets, but they all perform the same task, and that’s diffusing hard light. The problem with scrims is that while diffusing the light, they also lower the power of that light. This loss in power is dependent on the specific scrim you are using and can range from a quarter stop of light all the way to one and a quarter stop of light. The problem with this is that as you lower the light on your subject, while still getting a proper exposure on them, you are in turn raising the exposure of your background. In this video you can see how Joel Grimes uses a scrim net to help control this added brightness to his background.

Those Glowing Mushrooms (Part 1): 6 Steps to Photographing Your Own Fantasy World

Those Glowing Mushrooms (Part 1): 6 Steps to Photographing Your Own Fantasy World

As the northern autumn draws closer, bizarre little creatures pop up all over the temperate forest. On the forest floor, underneath hedgerows and on trees, alive or the ones who have fallen. Fungi are the cleaning crew of the forest as they take care of layers of fallen deadwood and provide nutrients back to the forest. Surely they are great subjects for macro photography. Like everyone else, I’m looking to find their reproductive organs: Mushrooms. They let our imagination run wild as these little toadstools hint of fantasy worlds when photographed in a certain way. This is how I recreate my own little fantasy world.

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