Photographer Creates Crazy Time-Lapse of Two Record-Setting Rock Climbers

Have you ever wondered what climbing one of the world's most aesthetic pieces of granite looks like? Watch this awe-inspiring video to find out.

Yosemite National Park is the proving ground for rock climbers all around the world. With beautiful granite walls featuring endless vertical terrain, it's no wonder so many climbers flock to this park. El Capitan is one wall in the park and arguably one of the most famous in the world (for rock climbers). The Nose is a 3,000-foot route that goes right up the middle of El Capitan. The first ascent took 45 days between July 1957 and November 1958.

Currently, most climbers usually take three to four days on the route before reaching the summit. Recently, however, professional rock climbers Brad Gobright and Jim Reynolds astonished the climbing world by sending the route in 2 hours 19 minutes and 44 seconds, setting a new record and breaking Alex Honnold's and Hans Florine's previous record by just four minutes.

Photographer Tristan Greszko was there to capture Gobright's and Reynolds' entire push. His film, "Two Nineteen Forty Four," is an incredible testament to the climbers' accomplishment. It's so different from any other climbing film or photograph and does a really nice job of putting the climbing of The Nose into perspective. By choosing to do a time-lapse rather than the usual documentary-style climbing film, Greszko makes rock climbing easily understandable and viewable for any audience, not just a climbing audience. Click the video above to give it a watch!

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5 Comments

Alex Armitage's picture

I got really into watching Climber/Extreme Adventure stuff a few months ago. It's still hard for me to comprehend that something that takes an average climber, who would be in excellent shape to make it up the face takes 3-4 days. Yet somehow there are people doing the entire thing in under 3 hours. I don't think I could make it up 3,000 foot of stairs in 3 hours. That's nearly 280 stories.

Mads Peter Iversen's picture

That's absolutely incredible!

Bill Metallinos's picture

Fantastic!

Gabe Border's picture

I've climbed with Gobright before. So much fun to see him work, a pleasure to share the wall with too.

Tim Behuniak's picture

So rad! Seems like a cool dude!