How to Remove a Stain Using Frequency Separation in Photoshop

If you photograph events or weddings, you will probably end up with a guest who spilled something distracting on their clothing at some point. This excellent video tutorial will show you how you can use frequency separation in Photoshop to remove the stain without affecting the underlying texture, patterns, or folds of the clothing. 

Coming to you from Unmesh Dinda from PiXimperfect, this excellent video tutorial will show you how to use frequency separation to get rid of a stain on someone's clothing. Typically, frequency separation is used to separate texture from color and luminance, allowing one to work on retouching blemishes (high frequency layer) without affecting underlying skin tones (low frequency layer). However, with texture separated from color, there is no reason one can't work on the low frequency layer instead. This is the idea behind this technique, where you will work on replacing color without touching texture and other fine detail. This can make your life a lot easier, as clothing often has a lot of fine textures that curve and change direction with the folds of the fabric, which can make it quite a pain to clone convincingly. Check out the video above for the full rundown from Dinda. 

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1 Comment

Luke Adams's picture

”Typically, frequency separation is used to separate texture from color and luminance, allowing one to work on retouching blemishes (high frequency layer) without affecting underlying skin tones (low frequency layer).“

Really? Not that you can’t work on the texture but I’ve never known that to be the “typical” use. I’ve always known the raison d’être of frequency separation to be about changing the color (ex. balancing skin tones) without affecting the underlying texture. Retouching without destroying texture.