Why There's More to Life in Landscape Photography Than Wide Angle Lenses

Mention landscape photography and focal lengths, and almost universally, photographers will think of wide angle lenses. And while the wide angle is the bread and butter lens for most landscape photographers, you could be missing out if you don't also carry a telephoto lens, and this great video will explain why.

Coming to you from Thomas Heaton, this great video talks about the benefits of using a telephoto lens in landscape photography. While wide angles are highly effective for capturing the beauty of an entire scene, individual elements and more unique compositions can be had by grabbing a longer lens. And the great thing is that for landscape work, you don't need the widest-aperture (and most expensive) options with image stabilization since you'll mostly be shooting at narrower apertures and on a tripod. For example, while Canon's top option is the EF 70-200mm f/2.8L IS II USM, the EF 70-200mm f/4L USM Lens is a highly regarded option that will work just as well, plus it's only a third of the price of the former option, and it's smaller and lighter, making it great for long hikes. Check out the video above for more.

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4 Comments

As a keen landscape photographer I looked at buying a 16-35mm wide angle but quickly realised that where I live, I would be better off with a 70-200 and am now realising a 100-400 is probably my best choice of 2nd lens after a standard zoom.

Rob Watts's picture

I tried out the 70-200 with and without a 1.4TC as well as the 100-400 with and without a 1.4TC. Ended up with the 100-400 II and use it along side my 16-35mm all the time. Yeah, people think I'm crazy, even on short hikes, to bring that thing, but man it comes in handy all the time.

A 100-400 or even a 70-300 (which I have along with a 55-210) ends up working out in many cases, especially if you are photographing birds and other wildlife while also trying to capture the surrounding landscape. Allows you to get relatively close and yet still capture landscapes in a more-focused way.

Rick McEvoy's picture

My go to landscape lens is my Canon 70-200mm lens. I save my wide angle lenses for architectural work.

Rick McEvoy

http://rickmcevoyphotography.co.uk/