Seagate Announces Massive 12 TB Desktop and NAS Drives

Seagate Announces Massive 12 TB Desktop and NAS Drives

Adding 20 percent storage to its previous high-capacity models, Seagate now offers 12 TB hard drives in a 3.5-inch size. These spinning disks feature transfer rates up to 250 MB/s and use still relatively new helium gas technology usually reserved for enterprise drives to reduce friction throughout the eight-platter internals. The new 12 TB drives come in three Guardian Series flavors: Barracuda Pro for desktop use and IronWolf or IronWolf Pro for use in network-attached storage devices that often feature multiple-drive RAID configurations.

The Barracuda Pro and IronWolf Pro come with a five-year warranty and two years of Seagate Rescue (the company's data recovery service) while the more affordable IronWolf version comes with a standard three-year warranty. The $70 difference between the Pro and non-pro versions could add up for a small studio's multi-drive bay, but the extra warranty and two-year peace of mind with data recovery should something go wrong might make it worthwhile to spring for the IronWolf Pro.

By using helium gas inside these drives, Seagate keeps friction down to a minimum, which is important to keep temperatures down while writing so much data in such a tight space.

The Barracuda Pro will go on sale for $529.99 while the IronWolf and IronWolf Pro will sell for $469.99 and $539.99, respectively. While that might sound expensive for a single drive, these prices actually represent fairly reasonable costs of roughly $40-45 per terabyte.

Posted In: 
Log in or register to post comments

11 Comments

On monday we will be releasing a video on our new 10gbps server build. We built it right before these came out. Bummer

And why are you regretting it? Because of the amount of data you could have installed ? Or for another technical reason ?

Just because we could have squeezed more TBs into our expensive NAS. No other reason.

Paul Seiler's picture

Don’t be upset Lee. Seagate has a class action lawsuit against them due to how high their drives failure rates are. Admittedly that was for their 3TB drives specifically, they’re still an awful brand.

https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.pcworld.com/article/3028981/storage/sea...

I was going to mention something similar. In my case I had nothing but bad luck with external Seagate drives where every single one failed long before they should be expected to. I stopped using them a few years ago and I switched to WD and so far no failures. Hopefully they perform better today.

One important thing to consider Lee is that you should never use a new and yet unproven hard drive for important storage needs. That's a big risk, with any drive manufacturer. Give it six months or so. Consider that military and space hardware routinely use components that are not cutting edge due to reliability concerns.

Daniel Ott's picture

Same here, Seagate in general have been a nightmare for me. Got given my last Seagate drive a year or so back and that went down on me literally this week. Never ever had a problem with WD, and that is all I ever buy now.

Paul Seiler's picture

I’ve been keeping eyes on BackBlaze’ results of thousands of drives and their failure rates for a while now and Seagate always fail fast and hard. It’ll take something huge for me to ever trust Seagate again.
https://www.backblaze.com/blog/hard-drive-failure-stats-q2-2017/

Fritz John Asuro's picture

I know SSDs are like gold, but after all the nightmares of spinning drives, I promised to myself that I'll never use such drives for my photography storage solution.

What concerns me about SSDs is that when they fail all the data often (usaully?) goes poof, where as in most cases you can recover significant amounts of data from a hard drive, even if it means having it rebuilt by a data recovery service,

Fritz John Asuro's picture

Well that's one thing as well. I guess there's no pure solution.

Unfortunately, not yet. It's ridiculous that we still don't have a fast and long lasting storage solution. Meanwhile, I now have to cut into my iMac to replace the hard drive.