[BTS Video] Toronto Maple Leafs Photo Shoot

Here's a great behind-the-scenes time lapse video from photographer Finn O'Hara. It's from a photo shoot he did for the Toronto Maple Leaf hockey team. They set up on the ice and it was an 18-hour production. You'll see the ginormous maple leaf backdrop, measuring 55 ft by 85 ft. Fantastic work from our neighbors to the north!

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10 Comments

David Hobby's picture

Was a very cool shoot. I posted about this in 2009 and Finn spent some time answering Q's in the comments. ('Cause he is one of the Good Guys.)

http://strobist.blogspot.com/2009/11/this-finn-ohara-shoot-probably-will...

Thats pretty cool but why didn't they just composite it?? It would have been much cheaper.

I don't understand the "brainlessness" in the arena to do all that work just top get those shots that could've been done with minimal props, certainly not at that scale, and lighting . . . . I just can;t stand all this "higher than thou" setup mentality.

Yep, it didn't make a lot of sense to do all that work if you could have done it so much easier

And I can promise you there was still some retouching done on these. Looks good on your resume when you can say you did something this large with your clients money. The lighting was fantastic, the time lapse sucked so bad I fast forward through it and it was already sped up. I'm thinking the timelapse was part of the package, hence it needing to take a long time and be done without compositing.

and yet they still didn't male the playoffs.... again  (spoken as a disgruntled Toronto based photographer myself... who didn't get the gig, LOL) 

As for doing it cheaper... the Leafs are the richest team in the league, so I guess money was not a real object!

Seshan's picture

Leafs suck. That's all I have to say.

Actually, I could answer all your questions.  

I'm a fellow Toronto photographer who was hired to light the stills portion of that set.
The reason why it was shot on location was because we were essentially piggy backing a video shoot which required that big setup.   The first 4:32 seconds of that time lapse video, we're actually watching a crew set up for the video that they were filming.At 4:33, you can see our tiny stills sets in the bottom left hand corner.  We had 3 different sets going, using their backdrops as our backgrounds.Yes, we could have shot the players in studio, but we killed two birds with one stone that day.  The players were there, so we had to be as well. (try getting 35 prima donnas to come out to a 2nd shoot)

And as far as shooting on location, why not?!  It's what makes us professional photographers.  Clients need to realize this as we're constantly trying to justify what we do and the money we charge.

If any 'Timmy' in his basement could photoshop these shots, then we'd all be out of a job.  We have to stand up for our rates and our skill set!!

If you're a photographer, and you're reading this, be sure to push your clients into spending what needs to be spent.  In the end, 'you get what you pay for'.

Cheers!

Actually, I could answer all your questions.  

I'm a fellow Toronto photographer who was hired to light the stills portion of that set.
The reason why it was shot on location was because we were essentially piggy backing a video shoot which required that big setup.   The first 4:32 seconds of that time lapse video, we're actually watching a crew set up for the video that they were filming.At 4:33, you can see our tiny stills sets in the bottom left hand corner.  We had 3 different sets going, using their backdrops as our backgrounds.Yes, we could have shot the players in studio, but we killed two birds with one stone that day.  The players were there, so we had to be as well. (try getting 35 prima donnas to come out to a 2nd shoot)

And as far as shooting on location, why not?!  It's what makes us professional photographers.  Clients need to realize this as we're constantly trying to justify what we do and the money we charge.

If any 'Timmy' in his basement could photoshop these shots, then we'd all be out of a job.  We have to stand up for our rates and our skill set!!

If you're a photographer, and you're reading this, be sure to push your clients into spending what needs to be spent.  In the end, 'you get what you pay for'.

Cheers!

After reading all the comments, it was a little obvious before I hit the bottom this clearly wasn't going to be for stills alone.. A fairly hefty production budget was allotted for a shoot of this size and still were merely a by-product of this entire setup. I would have liked to see the final video output for the work having gone into this set.